THE UK’S (PROBABLY THE WORLD’S) ONLY PERMANENT QUADROPHENIA COLLECTION HERE AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL

ALSO NOW INCLUDING AND EMBRACING NORTHERN SOUL DANCE AND MUSIC SCENE MEMORABILIA AS WELL AS SCOOTER BOYS , SKA,TWO TONE, SKINHEAD, MODS , RUDE BOYS & GIRLS , REGGAE SKINS AND 1960’S REVISITED  MEMORABILIA TOO .

ALL IN ALL A TRULY FASCINATING INSIGHT AND EXHIBITION INTO YOUTH CULTURE AND BEYOND HERE IN THE UK ….TO FURTHER COMPLIMENT OUR QUADROPHENIA COLLECTION 

Here are some of our favourite clips from this great iconic British film Quadrophenia .Still to this day a much loved masterpiece depicting the youth culture of 1960’s here in the UK

They;ve only gone and killed Jimmy’s scooter …. fortunately only a mock up one made for this scene . Here at our Quadrophenia collection we have a 100% replica of the original Lambretta scooter used by Jimmy (Phil Daniels) made up from many of the original parts of the scooter prior to the original scooter being rebuilt , restored with new parts for its subsequent sale at London’s Bonham’s auction in 2008 for £36,000

Iconic Quadrophenia scooter sold

Quadrophenia scooter

The Lambretta became synonymous with the Mod movement of the 1960s. Incidentally
many of the original parts of this scooter as used in the film have been used on the replica scooter on display at Littledean Jail’s Quadrophenia collection which also houses the original “Ace Face ” (Sting) GS Vespa scooter

The Lambretta scooter ridden by actor Phil Daniels in the iconic 1970s film Quadrophenia has sold at auction for £36,000 – more than had been expected.

The scooter, which was ridden by Daniels’s character James “Jimmy” Cooper in The Who-inspired movie, had a list price of £20,000 to £25,000.

The bike, which is now fully-restored, was spotted rusting in a garden in Southsea, Portsmouth, by Paul Marsh.

It was sold at Bonhams auction house in London on Tuesday.

Mod culture

Earlier, Stephanie Connell, of Bonhams, said: “We have a few items from Quadrophenia come through the auction house but a scooter is very rare.

“It has been fully restored and is in great condition. We are expecting a lot of interest.”

Mr Marsh realised the scooter featured in the film because of its distinctive number plate.

The Lambretta become an integral part of British youth culture in the 1960s as a favourite mode of transport of the fashion-conscious Modernists, or Mods.

Here’s the epic trailer for this cult classic film

Another great clip from the film…..

here’s the Wiki info on the film….

Quadrophenia is a 1979 British film, loosely based around the 1973 rock opera of the same name by The Who. The film stars Phil Daniels as a Modnamed Jimmy. It was directed by Franc Roddam in his feature directing debut. Unlike the film adaptation of TommyQuadrophenia is not a musical film.

The film, set in 1965, follows the story of Jimmy Cooper (Phil Daniels), a London Mod. Disillusioned by his parents and a job as a post room boy in an advertising firm, Jimmy finds an outlet for his teenage angst with his Mod friends Dave (Mark Wingett), Chalky (Philip Davis) and Spider (Gary Shail). However, his angst and confusion are compounded by the fact that one of his rivals is in fact childhood friend Kevin (Ray Winstone).[edit]Story

bank holiday weekend provides the excuse for the rivalry between Mods and Rockers to come to a head, as they both descend upon the seaside town ofBrighton. A series of running battles ensues. As the police close in on the rioters, Jimmy escapes down an alleyway with Steph (Leslie Ash), a girl on whom he has a crush, to have sex. When the pair emerge, they find themselves in the middle of the melee just as police are succeeding in detaining rioters. Jimmy is arrested and later fined £50.

Back in London, Jimmy becomes increasingly depressed. He is thrown out of his house by his mother, who finds his stash of amphetamine pills. He then quits his job, spends his severance package on more pills, and finds out that Steph has become the girlfriend of his friend Dave. After a brief fight with Dave, Jimmy’s Lambretta scooter is accidentally destroyed, and he takes a train back to Brighton. He revisits the scene of his encounter with Steph, and then discovers that his idol, Ace Face (played by Sting), is in reality a lowly bellboy at a Brighton hotel. He steals Ace’s scooter and heads out to the cliffs at Beachy Head, where he rides towards the cliff edge. The film ends with the scooter smashing on the rocks below.

[edit]Cast

John Lydon (Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistolsscreen-tested for the role of Jimmy. However, the distributors of the film refused to insure him for the part and he was replaced by Phil Daniels.[1][2]

The cast were reunited after 28 years at Earls Court on 1 and 2 September 2007 as part of The Quadrophenia Reunion at the London Film & Comic Con run by Quadcon.co.uk.[3] Subsequently the cast agreed to be part of a Quadrophenia Convention at Brighton in 2009.[3]

[edit]Soundtrack

[edit]Production notes

Several references to The Who appear throughout the film, including an anachronistic inclusion of a repackaged Who album that was not available at the time, a clip of the band performing “Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere” on the TV series Ready Steady Go!, pictures of the band and a “Maximum R&B” poster in Jimmy’s bedroom, and the inclusion of “My Generation” during a party gatecrashing scene. The film was almost cancelled when Keith Moon, the drummer for The Who, died, but in the words of Roddam, the producers, Roy Baird and Bill Curbishley, “held it together” and the film was made.

Only one scene in the whole film was shot in the studio; all others were on location. Beachy Head, where Jimmy may or may not have tried to kill himself at the end of the film, was the location of a real-life suicide that supposedly influenced the film’s ending.

The stunt coordinators underestimated the distance that the scooter would fly through the air after being driven off Beachy Head. Franc Roddam, who shot the scene from a helicopter, was almost hit.

Jeff Dexter, a club dancer and disc jockey fixture in the Sixties London music scene was the DJ in the club scenes, and was the uncredited choreographer of 500 extras for the ballroom and club scenes. He also choreographed Sting’s feet in his dance close-ups. Dexter managed America whose first major gig at “Implosion” at The Roundhouse, Chalk Farm, was the opening act to The Who on 20 December 1970.

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