HEINRICH HIMMLER – NAZI SS WARLORD,”LORD OF THE RUNES”,THE NAZI OCCULT, ILLUMINATI AND HIS WEWELSBURG CASTLE

BELOW IS  A BRIEF INSIGHT INTO THE NAZI SS AND OCCULT EXHIBITION HERE ON DISPLAY AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL . VERY DIVERSE AND THOUGHT PROVOKING TO SAY THE LEAST .

WE ALSO FEATURE AN INTRIGUING INSIGHT INTO THE WORLD OF THE ILLUMINATI , WITCHCRAFT, THE OCCULT, DEVIL WORSHIP, MYSTERIOUS CELEBRITY DEATHS AND BEYOND

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IMAGE OF BAPHOMET , A FAVOURITE NAZI  OCCULT SYMBOL

 

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BELOW IS LINK TO OUR WEBSITE PAGE WHICH FEATURES MORE INFORMATION, IMAGES AND VIDEOS …. AS IS FEATURED HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

PLEASE CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO ACCESS OUR PAGE 

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Himmler’s SS Mystical castle: Wewelsburg:

 

 

It is said that the Wewelsburg was going to be the “Holy Grail Castle” of the Nazi regime, once it had established itself as rulers of the world. Is this true, and, if so, what was their ambition in this vast building project?

 

It is clear that any Grail Castle to be built would have a geometrical design, and in the case of the Wewelsburg, that is a triangle. For Himmler, the Wewelsburg was not so much the location where the Grail was hidden, but where his Grail Order – the SS, the Schutzstaffel – and its sacred treasures – rumoured to be the Spear of Destiny – would be brought, and from which the magical power of the Nazi regime would radiate out.

The castle was not built by the Nazi regime; its history started several centuries before the National Socialists came to power in 1933. In its current form, the castle was built from 1603 to 1609, as a secondary residence for Fürstbischof Theodor von Fürstenberg, the prince-bishop of Paderborn, whose primary residence was the castle at Neuhaus. However, there existed a castle on the site from the 9th century onwards. At the time, it withheld an invasion of the Huns, its location near what was believed to be the site where the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest occurred. This battle occurred in 9 AD, when various Germanic tribes made an alliance and ambushed and destroyed three Roman legions. The battle was the start of a seven year long war, whereby the Rhine became the boundary of the Roman Empire. It should therefore not come as a surprise that it was seen as a symbol of German unity and a demonstration that a united Germany could conquer all – as it was, of course, felt it would do again….

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The Nazis plans: put into effect by the use of slave labour…

It meant that the estate had the shape of a spear, underlining the unconfirmed belief that the site would become the location where the Spear of Destiny would be held. One story goes that Hitler saw his future when he visited the Museum in Vienna where the Spear was on display, and that he became convinced that whoever possessed it, controlled the fate of the world. That the Wewelsburg was going to be the New Jerusalem and the centre of Germany is in evidence as from 1941 onwards, the architects called the complex the “Centre of the World”. In line with sacred mythology, the design would sit on a mountain, surrounded by a lake, as there were plans to flood the valley.

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THE AUSCHWITZ GOALKEEPER -RON JONES

AT THE GRAND OLD AGE OF 98…. BRITAIN’S OLDEST SURVIVING AUSCHWITZ NAZI DEATH CAMP  INMATE, NOW FEATURED HERE IN AND AMONGST THE NAZI HOLOCAUST YEARS EXHIBITION AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

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The Auschwitz goalkeeper: British prisoner of war who played in football match at Nazi death camp returns to bury the past

  • Ron Jones, 96, held in E715 – a prisoner of war camp alongside the main Auschwitz extermination camp in Poland
  • During the week prisoners of war were employed at forced labour camps but on Sunday allowed to play football
  • Games would take place on a field outside the camp with armed German guards watching
  • The Red Cross provided the teams with four sets of shirts – English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh
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An Auschwitz survivor who played in goal for the Welsh team in the Nazi death camp’s football league has returned to its site to bury the ghosts of his past.

Ron Jones, 96, was held in E715 – a prisoner of war camp alongside the main Auschwitz extermination camp in Poland – after being captured by German troops during World War II.

He said the soldiers were terrified.

‘We did not know what would happen to us. We thought at one time they would stick us in the gas chamber,’ said Ron.

‘It was not just Jews going in, it was Polish, political prisoners, gypsies, homosexuals.’

During the week prisoners were employed at forced labour camps, but on their rest day they were allowed to play football on a field just outside the camp – with armed German guards watching from the sidelines.

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Father-of-one Ron said: “We didn’t work on a Sunday so we used to play football.’

The Red Cross heard about it and brought the teams four sets of shirts – English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh.

Ron, a widower, of Newport, South Wales, played in goal for the Welsh team at the camp, which is situated near the Polish town of Oswiecim.

‘When you’re under those conditions it was a real pleasure to play football on a Sunday,’ he said.

‘But we could only play in the summer, of course, because in the winter it was deep with snow.’

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Prisoner of war Ron Jones (centre, back row) – the goalkeeper for the Welsh team in the Auschwitz football league.

Football was a brief respite from the prisoners’ suffering as throughout the games smoke would rise ominously from the chimneys of Auschwitz.

“The first thing you’d notice was the smell,’ said Ron. ‘If the wind was in your direction the smell was terrible.’

‘We were always frightened we would be next.’

He left the camp near the end of 1945 as part of the Auschwitz death march – when the Nazis forcibly moved prisoners as the Soviet army came to liberate.

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Former Nazi death camp Auschwitz in Oswiecim, Poland, where Ron played in goal for the Welsh team during World War II.

For more than four months he was marched 900 miles across Europe before eventually being freed by American troops.

He lost half his body weight and had to watch more than a hundred of his allied comrades die in the freezing conditions.

But he survived the ordeal and eventually returned to his home to be reunited with his wife Gwladys.

Ron is now only one of three men still alive who survived the death march.

He has returned to Auschwitz as a book about his survival called The Auschwitz Goalkeeper is published later this month.

Ron said returning to the death camp stirred up strong memories.

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Auschwitz-Birkenau in 2005, and in 1945, where Ron was held after being captured by German troops.

‘There was the humiliation and the lack of food but on the whole life wasn’t too bad.’

‘The Germans, contrary to what a lot of people think, were pretty good to us on the whole.’

But it was the march that was terrible.

‘I could still see it when I first went back to Auschwitz, I couldn’t sleep with the memories.’

About 1.5 million people, primarily Jews, were killed at the Auschwitz  complex between 1940 and 1945. Two years after the end of World War II it became a museum.