THE BELLE STARS IKO IKO

AS IT’S FRIDAY HERE’S OUR BREAK FROM OUR NORMAL TRUE CRIME, SLEAZE & SCANDAL CONTENT. HERE ARE SOME MORE OF LITTLEDEAN JAIL OWNERS FAVOURITE MUSIC TRACKS, PAST & PRESENT HOPE YOU LIKE THEM TOO…..
HERES ANOTHER 1980’S CLASSIC ….. IKO IKO BY THE BELLE STARS (1982)

Career

After The Bodysnatchers broke up, guitarists Stella Barker and Sarah-Jane Owen, saxophonist Miranda Joyce, keyboardist Penny Leyton, and drummer Judy Parsons decided to form a new band, recruiting bass player Lesley Shone and lead vocalist Jennie Matthias (also known as Jenny McKeown and Jenny Bellestar). Their first performance was on Christmas Day, 1980, before they had chosen a name.

Within a short time, the group became well known around London, notably appearing on the front cover of Sounds magazine early in 1981. Shortly thereafter, they were signed by Stiff Records, then highly successful due to its star act, Madness.

The band’s debut single, “Hiawatha” was released in the late spring of 1981, produced by Madness producers Clive Langer & Alan Winstanley. The band promoted the single by playing support for ska acts The Beat and Madness. However, the single failed to chart, despite continuing media attention.

The same production team was responsible for “Slick Trick”, the second single. It too failed to chart. Keyboard player Penny Leyton left the band late in the year, to be replaced on saxophone andkeyboards by Clare Hirst. Leyton later joined The Deltones.

When the third single, the radio friendly “Another Latin Love Song” again failed to break into the charts, the band tried cover versions instead, with some success. “Iko Iko“, a cover of The Dixie Cups‘ 1965 hit (later featured in the 1988 movie Rain Man), was The Belle Stars’ long-hoped-for UK Singles Chart debut, peaking at a modest number 35 in June 1982. The Belle Stars furthered this with “The Clapping Song” (their first top 20 hit), a remake of the 1965 Shirley Ellis hit, and then “Mockingbird”, a hit for Inez and Charlie Foxx in 1969 and James Taylor and Carly Simon in 1974.

In January 1983 the Belle Stars released what would be their signature single, “Sign of the Times”, peaking at number three, and a chart success throughout Europe. The song’s music video, showing the Belle Stars in tuxedos, was also played frequently by MTV in the United States. The song went on to become the 30th best selling single of 1983 in the UK.

It was followed a month later by the band’s eponymous debut album, which reached number 15 on the UK Albums Chart.[1] As with the band’s singles, it was a mix of original songs and cover versions, including Bob and Earl‘s “Harlem Shuffle” (covered three years later by the Rolling Stones on Dirty Work) and Al Wilson‘s “The Snake”.

However, “Sign of the Times” proved to be the peak of the band’s success. Each follow-up single was less successful than its predecessor: “Sweet Memory”, reached number 22 in the charts in April 1983; “Indian Summer” number 52 in August; whilst “The Entertainer” did not chart. It took another year before the band had a minor hit, “80’s Romance”, which made number 71 in August 1984 before it dropped out after a week.[1] Despite this, the band continued to tour throughout Europe. However, the lack of success took its toll, and McKeown left the band, followed by others, until the band was down to Owen, Joyce, and Shone.

By 1984, Stiff Records was ailing, and it merged with Island Records; in July 1985 it was liquidated and bought by ZTT, the label owned by the husband and wife team of producer Trevor Horn and Jill Sinclair. Under Horn’s supervision, the three remaining members recorded a new Belle Stars album with the 4th & Broadway production team in New York City. However, the only tracks to be released were the single “World Domination”, a flop in Britain but peaked at number two for two weeks on the Billboard Dancefloor charts in the U.S.[2] Following this release the band broke up.

However, in 1989, the Belle Stars finally had a big U.S. chart hit, when “Iko Iko” reached number 14 on the Billboard Top 100 in March, after it was included on the soundtrack of the film Rain Man, starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. The song had been a favourite of Hoffman’s. Matthias toured the U.S. to promote the song.

Leyton went on to join the all girl ska band The Deltones in 1984, and they released an album on Unicorn Records in 1989. Matthias has recently guested on the 1973 and Decadent albums by Skaville UK, and has more recently formed a new ska band with Lee Thompson from Madness called The Dance Brigade, and is currently performing in her new band 1-Stop-Experience, with Skip McDonald, Paget King and Chico Chigas.

Personnel

  • Jennie Matthias: lead vocals
  • Sarah Jane Owen: lead guitar
  • Stella Barker : rhythm guitar
  • Penny Leyton: keyboards (1981–1982)
  • Miranda Joyce (born 26 July 1962): alto saxophone
  • Clare Hirst: tenor saxophone, keyboards (1982–1984)
  • Lesley Shone: bass
  • Judy Parsons: drums

Discography

]Singles

  • “Hiawatha” (Stiff Records) 1981 – UK
  • “Slick Trick” (Stiff Records) 1981 – UK
  • “Another Latin Love Song EP” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK
  • Iko Iko” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK #35, 1989 US #14
  • The Clapping Song” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK #11, AUS #4
  • “Mockingbird” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK #51
  • “Sign of the Times” (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK #3, AUS #45, US #75
  • “Sweet Memory” (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK #22
  • “Indian Summer” (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK #52
  • “The Entertainer” (Stiff Records) 1983 -UK #95
  • “80’s Romance” (Stiff Records) 1984 – UK #71
  • “World Domination” (Stiff Records) 1986 – US Dance #2
  • “Iko Iko” (Stiff Records) 1989 – US #14, AUS #7, UK #98[3]

]Albums

  • The Belle Stars (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK # 15,[1] AUS # 76
  • The Very Best (Stiff Records) 1994
  • 80’s Romance: The Complete Belle Stars (Salvo) 2010

STARS BEHIND BRAS AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL ……..JENNIE BELLESTAR

OUR TONGUE IN CHEEK, BIT OF HARMLESS FUN – STARS BEHIND BRA’S AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL CONTINUES TO GROW WITH THE ADDITION OF THESE ITEMS !!!! MORE TO FOLLOW…………. COME ON YOU CELEBS KEEP THEM COMING
LARGE ,MEDIUM OR SMALL SIZE DOES NOT MATTER HERE !!!!!!!!

SINCERE THANKS JENNIE FOR HAVING KINDLY CONTRIBUTED  ONE OF YOUR 1980’S  WELL WORN ON STAGE POLKA DOT BRA’S AND WONDERFUL EARLY PHOTOGRAPH OF YOURSELF WITH THE BAND.

GREATLY APPRECIATED AND WELCOME ADDITION TO OUR IMMORTALISED STARS BEHIND BRAS EXHIBITION HERE AT THE JAIL.

 

JENNIE BELLESTAR’S POLKA DOT BRA  COMPLETE WITH SIGNATURE AND DOODLE DRAWING

 

A VERY EARLY BELLE STARS SIGNED PUBLICITY PHOTO INSCRIBED TO LITTLEDEAN JAIL SENT WITH BRA AND LETTER

 

 

JENNIE BELLESTAR’S POLKA DOT BRA  COMPLETE WITH SIGNATURE AND DOODLE DRAWING

 

NOTE SENT WITH BRA AND PHOTO

AS ABOVE

 

CLOSE UP OF JENNIE BELLESTAR’S POLKA DOT BRA  COMPLETE WITH SIGNATURE AND DOODLE DRAWING

JENNIE PERFORMING WITH THE BELLE STARS IN EARLY 1980’S

 

SCREEN GRAB PIC FROM THE OFFICIAL IKO IKO VIDEO ….ALSO FEATURED IN THE GREAT CLASSIC FILM – RAINMAN

 

 

PICTURE DISK FOR THE CLASSIC HIT IKO IKO

SINGLE COVER FOR CLASSIC BELLE STAR HIT IKO IKO

 

JENNIE BELLESTAR PICTURED HEREON PHOTO SHOOT  AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL ON THE BACK OF THE ACE FACE QUADROPHENIA SCOOTER ALONGSIDE LEE THOMPSON OF MADNESS

 

 

The Belle Stars were an all female British rock band, founded in London in 1980 by former members of the 2 Tone ska revival bandThe Bodysnatchers.

Career

After The Bodysnatchers broke up, guitarists Stella Barker and Sarah-Jane Owen, saxophonist Miranda Joyce, keyboardist Penny Leyton, and drummer Judy Parsons decided to form a new band, recruiting bass player Lesley Shone and lead vocalist Jennie Matthias (also known as Jenny McKeown and Jenny Bellestar). Their first performance was on Christmas Day, 1980, before they had chosen a name.

Within a short time, the group became well known around London, notably appearing on the front cover of Sounds magazine early in 1981. Shortly thereafter, they were signed by Stiff Records, then highly successful due to its star act, Madness.

The band’s debut single, “Hiawatha” was released in the late spring of 1981, produced by Madness producers Clive Langer & Alan Winstanley. The band promoted the single by playing support for ska acts The Beat and Madness. However, the single failed to chart, despite continuing media attention.

The same production team was responsible for “Slick Trick”, the second single. It too failed to chart. Keyboard player Penny Leyton left the band late in the year, to be replaced on saxophone andkeyboards by Clare Hirst. Leyton later joined The Deltones.

When the third single, the radio friendly “Another Latin Love Song” again failed to break into the charts, the band tried cover versions instead, with some success. “Iko Iko“, a cover of The Dixie Cups‘ 1965 hit (later featured in the 1988 movie Rain Man), was The Belle Stars’ long-hoped-for UK Singles Chart debut, peaking at a modest number 35 in June 1982. The Belle Stars furthered this with “The Clapping Song” (their first top 20 hit), a remake of the 1965 Shirley Ellis hit, and then “Mockingbird”, a hit for Inez and Charlie Foxx in 1969 and James Taylor and Carly Simon in 1974.

In January 1983 the Belle Stars released what would be their signature single, “Sign of the Times”, peaking at number three, and a chart success throughout Europe. The song’s music video, showing the Belle Stars in tuxedos, was also played frequently by MTV in the United States. The song went on to become the 30th best selling single of 1983 in the UK.

It was followed a month later by the band’s eponymous debut album, which reached number 15 on the UK Albums Chart.[1] As with the band’s singles, it was a mix of original songs and cover versions, including Bob and Earl‘s “Harlem Shuffle” (covered three years later by the Rolling Stones on Dirty Work) and Al Wilson‘s “The Snake”.

However, “Sign of the Times” proved to be the peak of the band’s success. Each follow-up single was less successful than its predecessor: “Sweet Memory”, reached number 22 in the charts in April 1983; “Indian Summer” number 52 in August; whilst “The Entertainer” did not chart. It took another year before the band had a minor hit, “80’s Romance”, which made number 71 in August 1984 before it dropped out after a week.[1] Despite this, the band continued to tour throughout Europe. However, the lack of success took its toll, and McKeown left the band, followed by others, until the band was down to Owen, Joyce, and Shone.

By 1984, Stiff Records was ailing, and it merged with Island Records; in July 1985 it was liquidated and bought by ZTT, the label owned by the husband and wife team of producer Trevor Horn and Jill Sinclair. Under Horn’s supervision, the three remaining members recorded a new Belle Stars album with the 4th & Broadway production team in New York City. However, the only tracks to be released were the single “World Domination”, a flop in Britain but peaked at number two for two weeks on the Billboard Dancefloor charts in the U.S.[2] Following this release the band broke up.

However, in 1989, the Belle Stars finally had a big U.S. chart hit, when “Iko Iko” reached number 14 on the Billboard Top 100 in March, after it was included on the soundtrack of the film Rain Man, starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. The song had been a favourite of Hoffman’s. Matthias toured the U.S. to promote the song.

Leyton went on to join the all girl ska band The Deltones in 1984, and they released an album on Unicorn Records in 1989. Matthias has recently guested on the 1973 and Decadent albums by Skaville UK, and has more recently formed a new ska band with Lee Thompson from Madness called The Dance Brigade, and is currently performing in her new band 1-Stop-Experience, with Skip McDonald, Paget King and Chico Chigas.

[edit]Personnel

  • Jennie Matthias: lead vocals
  • Sarah Jane Owen: lead guitar
  • Stella Barker : rhythm guitar
  • Penny Leyton: keyboards (1981–1982)
  • Miranda Joyce (born 26 July 1962): alto saxophone
  • Clare Hirst: tenor saxophone, keyboards (1982–1984)
  • Lesley Shone: bass
  • Judy Parsons: drums

[edit]Discography

[edit]Singles

  • “Hiawatha” (Stiff Records) 1981 – UK
  • “Slick Trick” (Stiff Records) 1981 – UK
  • “Another Latin Love Song EP” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK
  • Iko Iko” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK #35, 1989 US #14
  • The Clapping Song” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK #11, AUS #4
  • “Mockingbird” (Stiff Records) 1982 – UK #51
  • “Sign of the Times” (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK #3, AUS #45, US #75
  • “Sweet Memory” (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK #22
  • “Indian Summer” (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK #52
  • “The Entertainer” (Stiff Records) 1983 -UK #95
  • “80’s Romance” (Stiff Records) 1984 – UK #71
  • “World Domination” (Stiff Records) 1986 – US Dance #2
  • “Iko Iko” (Stiff Records) 1989 – US #14, AUS #7, UK #98[3]

[edit]Albums

  • The Belle Stars (Stiff Records) 1983 – UK # 15,[1] AUS # 76
  • The Very Best (Stiff Records) 1994
  • 80’s Romance: The Complete Belle Stars (Salvo) 2010

POLITICAL SCANDALS,SLEAZE AND MORE AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL

LAST EDITION OF THE NEWS OF THE WORLD PUBLISHED JULY 10TH 2011

GREAT SLAP FROM RUPERT MURDOCH’S WIFE IN THE PROTESTER’S FACE AT THE INQUIRY HEARING -WHILST PROTECTING  HER HUSBAND 19TH JULY 2011

RUPERT MURDOCH PICTURED AT THE SAME INQUIRY

WENDI DENG  ,WIFE OF RUPERT MURDOCH LEAPS INTO ACTION TO DEFEND HER HUSBAND FROM PROTESTER’S FOAM PIE ATTACK , 19TH JULY 2011

WENDI DENG PICTURED BEHIND HUSBAND AND STEPSON  SHORTLY BEFORE FOAM PIE ATTACK ON HER HUSBAND AT THE INQUIRY

HOW THE DAILY EXPRESS REPORTED THE ATTACK

UNLAWFUL KILLING OF LADY DIANA …THE FILM, BANNED IN THE UK

Should this be censored here in the UK ?

Should the legacy of Lady Diana be revisited in this way?

Surely it is insensitive to subject her children and family to these further conspiiracy revelations?

Diana: Gagged! The movie, the conspiracy, and why you are not allowed to make up your own mind

A controversial documentary on the death of Diana – who would have been 50 on Friday – will be launched in Ireland next week. In Britain, it is banned and its director Keith Allen asks: What are they so afraid of?

Sunday, 26 June 2011

Diana and Dodi Fayed at the Ritz, Paris, on the night they died

Diana and Dodi Fayed at the Ritz, Paris, on the night they died

Near the beginning of Unlawful Killing, I show a clip of Princess Diana (who would have been 50 on Friday) speaking less than two years before her untimely death. Well aware that sections of the British establishment had begun to despise her (following her separation from Prince Charles) and wanted her to disappear from public life, she summarised her plight in two pithy phrases: “She won’t go quietly – that’s the problem.”

My film about the inquest into her death won’t go quietly either, despite the best efforts of sections of the British press to stifle it at birth. That’s not surprising, because journalists widely regarded the 2007-08 inquest as a complete waste of time and money, so it was inevitable that many of them would also dismiss my documentary, which was screened twice at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Yet what those screenings revealed was a yawning chasm between the perceptions of the press (several of whom did not actually see the film before writing about it) and those of the audiences who did attend. Because while the former were overwhelmingly hostile, the latter were overwhelmingly favourable, and were persuaded by the evidence that I and my production team have assembled that there was something extremely fishy about what happened in the Alma tunnel in 1997 and in the Royal Courts of Justice a decade later.

For the record, both Cannes screenings were packed from start to finish, as was an earlier test screening in Los Angeles (conducted by Nielsen NRG), and audience comments taken afterwards were almost uniformly positive. In the weeks since Cannes, the film has sold to a dozen territories worldwide, with negotiations in a further 20 still in full swing.

The veteran US investigative author and lawyer Mark Lane (who first exposed the cover-up surrounding the assassination of JFK) has endorsed the central findings of my documentary. And on 6 July, it will receive its first full public screening as a highlight of the Galway Film Festival (with many more festivals also eager to show it).

So why did much of the British press report that bored audiences walked out during the screenings at Cannes, when that was demonstrably untrue (and was flatly contradicted by the enthusiastic vox pops which were recorded outside the cinema by Reuters TV)? Why did they pretend that I had tried to conceal the financial backing I had received from Mohamed al-Fayed (whose son Dodi also died in the Alma crash), when I had written lengthy articles in The Guardian and the Daily Mail during the previous week, explaining in great detail precisely how (and by whom) the film had been funded? Why did many of them claim that I had displayed a “shocking” photograph of Diana in her death throes, when no such photograph was ever included?

Why did they claim that there was nothing new in the film, when this is the first ever reconstruction and analysis of the longest inquest in British legal history? And when (to take just one of many examples) it highlights the apparent discrepancy between evidence given under oath by Sir Robert Fellowes (the Queen’s private secretary and Diana’s brother-in-law), who said he was on holiday during the period before and after Diana’s death, and entries in the newly published diaries of Alastair Campbell which suggest that he was overseeing Diana’s funeral arrangements?

And why, three years on, is most of the UK press still unwilling to accept the verdict of the inquest jury, which decided that the Alma tunnel crash was not an accident but an “unlawful killing” (the coroner having denied them the option of “murder”), and that unidentified “following vehicles” (not the paparazzi, as was incorrectly reported) had been a principal cause?

What the British press writes does not greatly matter, because over the next few months, people all around the world will have the chance to see the film, and to form their own judgements. Everywhere except Britain, that is, because as things stand, I am legally prevented from screening the film in the UK.

That’s not primarily because of fears about libel, as has been suggested by some journalists (although much of the information that we have unearthed about Prince Philip will shock many viewers), but because my film has been deemed by lawyers to be in contempt of court, since it openly questions the impartiality of a coroner who had sworn an oath of allegiance to the Queen, yet was sitting in the Royal Courts of Justice, presiding over a case that involved the monarchy.

Furthermore, it dares to look at why he repeatedly refused to call senior members of the royal family to the inquest, despite Diana having written a sworn note explicitly stating that her husband was planning an “accident” to her car (a note, incidentally, which the Metropolitan Police did not reveal to the press and public for six years, or the French police who first investigated the crash). Saying this explicitly is, it seems, against the law.

This isn’t just a whinge from a thin-skinned director, piqued by a handful of negative reviews. We are living in a time when oppressive judges routinely prevent the British press from publishing information of genuine public interest, and my film has fallen foul of that same authoritarian repression.

Whatever journalists may think about Diana’s death, surely they should always be in favour of the disclosure of information. That way, the British public can decide for itself whether Diana was simply the victim of a drunk driver (as most of the UK press insist was the case), or whether (as is my contention) the inquest was a shameless establishment cover-up, a modern-day version of the notorious Dreyfus case, in which the British press has (until now) played a shameful and obsequious supporting role.

Either way, my film – like Diana – will not go quietly.

RIP …. GLOUCESTERSHIRE’S FORMER MOTORHEAD GUITARIST “WURZEL”

WE AT THE JAIL WERE SADDENED TO HEAR OF THE DEATH OF OUR LOCAL ICONIC FORMER GUITARIST OF MOTORHEAD – WURZEL .

AS A TRIBUTE TO HIM AND IS ONE OF MY ALL TIME FAVOURITE  TRACKS …HERE’S MOTORHEAD PERFORMING THE 1980 WORLDWIDE HIT  “ACE OF SPADES” LIVE

RIP …. GLOUCESTERSHIRE’S FORMER  MOTORHEAD GUITARIST “WURZEL”

(MICHAEL BURSTON)


as in the metro

Motorhead’s Wurzel dies of heart attack while pouring pint of Guinness

Legendary Motorhead guitarist Wurzel died on Saturday after suffering a heart attack while pouring a pint of Guinness and joking with friends, it has been announced.

A statement on the band’s website said: ‘We are greatly saddened to confirm that our long-time friend and comrade Wurzel died Saturday at his home.

Lemmy paid tribute to Wurzel at Knebworth (Getty)Lemmy paid tribute to Wurzel at Knebworth (Getty)

‘Wurz was pouring a Guinness and cracking a joke when he succumbed to a heart attack; at least we know he went with a smile.’

The 61-year-old, real name Michael Burston, became part of Motorhead in 1984 and featured on nine studio and live albums until his departure in 1995.

Motorhead, who played at Knebworth on Sunday, dedicated their Sonisphere Festival set to their old bandmate.

Lemmy, the lead singer of the heavy metal band, led the tributes to Wurzel.

Posting on the band’s website: ‘Wurzel was my friend and my brother and he’s never going to laugh with me again or bitch me out or do anything. And that truly and cosmically sucks.

‘RIP Wurz. God speed. Good man.’

Lemmy recently announced the creation of a new band, HeadCat, along with Jim Phantom and Danny B Harvey, which will ‘remind the world how rock’n’roll is supposed to sound’.

The band’s first album, Walk The Walk, Talk The Talk, is out now and HeadCat will be touring in October.

AS REPORTED IN THE SUN

Motorhead rocker Wurzel dies at 61

 

 

GUITAR legend Wurzel of the band Motorhead has died, it was announced last night.

Wurzel, real name Michael Burston, suffered a heart attack “while pouring a Guinness and cracking a smile”.

The 61-year-old, originally from Cheltenham, Gloucs, joined Motorhead in 1984 after playing in other bands.

He had previously served in the Army, where he got his nickname because of his West Country accent and likeness to Worzel Gummidge the scarecrow.

He played on nine studio and live albums until his departure in 1995.

And he was a favourite with fans for his jester-like antics in contrast to the sterner image of the band’s lead singer Ian “Lemmy” Kilmister.

Lemmy said last night: “Wurzel was my friend and my brother and he’s never going to laugh with me again or bitch me out or do anything.

“And that truly and cosmically sucks. RIP Wurz. God speed. Good man.”

 

http://www.imotorhead.com/

THE DAMNED PERFORM “LOVE SONG”

AS A FORMER PUNK ROCKER MYSELF, HERE’S ONE OF MY FAVOURITE TRACKS FROM THIS (WHAT WAS A BRILLIANT) ERA….. THE DAMNED – “LOVE SONG” RECORDED BACK IN 1979 RE-RELEASED IN 1982

FANTASTIC LIVE BAND THAT I SAW ON A GREAT MANY OCCASIONS  AND STILL PERFORMING LIVE SHOWS TO THIS DAY

http://www.officialdamned.com/

RAM JAM…”.BLACK BETTY”

STEP BACK IN TIME WITH THIS CLASSIC 1977 WORLDWIDE HIT SINGLE FROM AMERICA’S 1970’S ROCK BAND …RAM JAM ….”BLACK BETTY”. FOR THOSE OF YOU THAT HAVE NEVER KNOWN WHAT THE BAND LOOK LIKE … HERE THEY ARE….

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ram_Jam

THE CULT’S 1985 HIT …. RAIN

FOR ALL YOU ROCKERS, RAVERS, SINNERS, AND LOVERS OF THE CULT. HERE’S A GREAT CLASSIC TRACK WITH A BRILLIANT GUITAR RIFF AND HAUNTING VOCALS BY IAN ASTBURY .

http://www.the-cult.com/