GLYN DIX … GLOUCESTER’S SCHIZOPSYCHOTIC MURDERER, SATANIC WIFE KILLER AND PATHOLOGICAL LIAR

TRUE CRIME, MURDERABILIA , MAIMERABILIA AND MUCH MORE  HERE ON DISPLAY AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL 

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GLYN DIX RESIDED IN HIGH ORCHARD STREET , GLOUCESTER  IN THE LATE 1970’S   ( NOW GLOUCESTER QUAYS ) IN  GLOUCESTER DOCKS , IN A RENTED PROPERTY THEN OWNED BY PIA OVERBURY , WHOM HE MURDERED .

COINCIDENTALLY VERY CLOSE BY TO FRED AND ROSE WEST’S CAFE CALLED “THE GREEN LANTERN” AT 214 SOUTHGATE STREET , GLOUCESTER .

WERE GLYN DIX , FRED AND ROSE WEST FRIENDS  ??? …. PARTICULARLY WITH THEIR SATANIC  AND PERVERTED INTERESTS ???

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DID GLYN DIX FREQUENT 25 CROMWELL STREET AS WELL???

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FROM THE HANDS OF ONE OF BRITAIN’S MOST EVIL MURDERERS ….AND NOW FEATURED HERE AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

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Here below are two handwritten and signed letters written by Gloucester wife killer … Glyn Dix  from his prison cell whilst at HMP Wormwood Scrubs , London .

The first letter is dated in 1980 , shortly after being imprisoned for the rape and murder of 33 year old mother of two  Pia Overbury whose body was found in woodland , near Hartpury near Gloucester in  1979.

 

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Extract from Gloucester Citizen Newspaper in 1979

 

The letter below dated 1981 written by Dix whilst still imprisoned at HMP Wormwood Scrubs .

WHEN LIFE MEANS LIFE ….. AN EVIL SATANIC MURDERER WHO WILL NOW NEVER BE RELEASED FROM PRISON .

BELOW  DOCUMENTARY FOOTAGE ON EVIL GLOUCESTER MURDERER GLYN DIX  FEATURING PIA OVERBURY’S DAUGHTER MAXINE .

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GLYN DIX AT HIS WEDDING TO HAZEL DENVER IN 1999. HE MURDERED HER IN 2004

Saturday 19th June 2004, killer: Glyn Dix at his wedding to Hazel Denver in 1999. He murdered her in 2004.

Hazel Dix aged 54, was found at the house in Seymour Drive in the Abbeydale area of Redditch, Worcestershire, at about 4pm.
Hazel’s son Adam Langford found Dix with the body. Dix told him: “We’ve had a little argument”. Dix and Hazel made love before rowing over what TV channel to watch. He stabbed her three times. Dix used a knife, hacksaw and scissors to cut second wife Hazel’s body into 16 pieces at their home.
A post-mortem examination revealed she had suffered multiple stab wounds.
He was found guilty of murdering his wife Hazel in 2005, having stabbed her to death and chopped her body into 16 pieces at their home in Redditch, Worcestershire in the previous year.
Dix was sentenced to life imprisonment and it was then revealed that he had already been out of prison on life licence following a previous conviction for murdering Pia Overbury in the 1970s.
Dix was ordered to remain at the high security Ashworth Hospital in Merseyside until his death. Dix met Hazel six years previous while he was serving time for murdering mum-of-two Pia Overbury, 32, in the 1970’s

She had driven her son Adam to see Dix in jail after the pair became friends while her son was in prison.

Dix, who suffers from schizopsychotic affective disorder, will stay in Merseyside’s high-security Ashworth Hospital until he dies for killing Hazel last June
23rd February 2008, The Times newspaper, revealed that Dix was one of around 37 prisoners who had been issued with whole life tariffs and were unlikely ever to be released, as his trial judge had said that he was “too dangerous” ever to be paroled.

EVIL Glyn Dix was jailed for the rest of his life for butchering his wife under a full moon in a satanic-style slaying.

The monster cut the body of tragic Hazel into 16 pieces just three years after being freed from jail where he served 20 years for a gruesome slaying of another woman.

Dix, 51, struck after being introduced to Hazel by her son Adam who did not know details of the previous killing.

Mum-of-six Hazel, 54, was slaughtered in the kitchen of their home in Redditch, Worcs, and Dix crouched naked over her body hacking it to bits as Adam walked in.

The crime — committed during a full moon — had echoes of Dix’s first murder when he tied up, raped and shot Gloucester mum-of-two Pia Overbury in 1980 before blaming a “change in the seasons”. He was freed in 2001.

Yesterday he admitted the 2004 slaying of Hazel and Birmingham Crown Court caged him “for the rest of his natural life”.

20 Seymour Drive, Redditch

SNF10DIX-682_1102136aCrime scene … house in which Glyn Dix stabbed and chopped up his wife

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Hugh Worsnip, above, who worked as a reporter on The Citizen in Gloucester for 41 years, covered the murder of 33-year-old Pia Overbury, whose body was found in woodland near Hartpury, Gloucestershire.

Glyn Dix was convicted of murdering the mother-of-two and was jailed for 22 years in 1979. It also transpired that Miss Overbury was raped by Dix just 24 hours previously.

An interview with Hugh will feature in the last episode of “When Life Means Life”, which is being shown on the Crime & Investigation Network.

Said Hugh: “I remember it well and I remember going around to his house. It was absolutely terrible, one of the worst murder cases I have ever covered, for sure.”

Hugh also covered the Fred and Rosemary West Cromwell Street murders in 1994 and described it as one of the “nastiest” moments of his life.

The show comes about in the wake of murderer Arthur Hutchinson’s European Court of Human Rights bid to attempt to get out of his life sentence early.

If he’s successful, it could pave the way for others – including Glyn Dix – to do the same.

Dix, who was 26 at the time of the conviction, served the majority of his sentence and then married a woman called Hazel who he had befriended in jail.

They lived together in Redditch, Worcestershire. In 2004, he killed her too. Her son found Dix straddled over her with a knife in his hand.

Dix was sent to Ashworth in Liverpool for the rest of his life the following year.

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GLOUCESTERSHIRE POLICE CONSTABULARY’S FINGERPRINT KIT (CIRCA 1940’S)

A SUPERB PIECE OF GLOUCESTERSHIRE POLICE CRIME SCENE MEMORABILIA  ON DISPLAY AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL

JUST ONE OF A GREAT MANY BRITISH POLICE MEMORABILIA ITEMS THROUGH THE AGES ON DISPLAY IN ONE OF THE UK’S LARGEST PRIVATE COLLECTIONS OF LAW AND ORDER MATERIAL . 

BELOW ARE VARIOUS IMAGES OF WHAT  IS BELIEVED TO BE ONE OF THE VERY FEW SURVIVING VINTAGE  GLOUCESTERSHIRE CONSTABULARY’S FINGERPRINT KITS (CIRCA 1940’S) . COMPLETE WITH IT’S ORIGINAL BOX, INKS, ROLLER, POWDERS AND BRUSHES ETC .ALSO VARIOUS APPROPRIATE  DOCUMENTATION FOR FINGERPRINT EVIDENCE PURPOSES . VIEW OF  UNOPENED FINGERPRINT KIT BOXVARIOUS POLICE AND CRIME SCENE DOCUMENTATION FOUND WITHIN THE INNER SLEEVE OF FINGERPRINT KIT BOX

Fingerprint Bureau

Very many books and scientific papers have been published on the subject of Fingerprints, and reference to ‘the prints from man’s hand’ can even be found in the Bible.

The study of the application of fingerprints for useful purposes appears to have started in the latter part of the 17th century when, in 1684, the anatomist Doctor Nehemiah Grew published a paper on the subject which he illustrated with drawings of various fingerprint patterns. About the same period, in Italy, Professor Malpighi was investigating the function of the skin.

It was in 1860 that the use of fingerprints as a reliable means of individual identification really started. Sir William Herschel, an administrator in the province of Bengal, India, appreciated the unique nature of fingerprints and established the principle of their persistence. Fingerprints are formed in full detail before birth and remain unchanged throughout life unless they are affected by a deep seated injury. A method of classifying fingerprints and research in this field was initiated by Sir Francis Galton and Henry Faulds independently at the end of the 19th century.

Anthropometric measuring devices

Anthropometric measuring devices in brass and mounted on wood. Used in the Alphonse Bertillon system of identification

In 1900 a committee was appointed by the Home Secretary under the chairmanship of Lord Belper to enquire into methods of the ‘Identification of Criminals by Measurement and Fingerprints’. About this time, Mr. E.R. Henry, later to become Sir Edward Henry, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, published his book, ‘The Classification and Use of Fingerprints’. This proposed a method of fingerprint classification and comparison to replace the inaccurate Bertillon anthropometric measurement system, which was then in use, which only partially relied upon fingerprints for identification. Henry was one of sixteen witnesses invited to appear before this committee to explain the system which he had devised. Following the recommendations made by this committee, the Fingerprint Branch at New Scotland Yard was created in July 1901 using the Henry System of Classification.

The Fingerprint Branch at New Scotland Yard, which started with just three people, has expanded over the years and the present Identification Service is now provided by a staff of 600 technical and administrative officers. Today, there are two Fingerprint Bureaux at New Scotland Yard, viz. the National Fingerprint Office (which together with the National Criminal Record Office forms the National Identification Bureau) and the Metropolitan Police Scenes of Crime Branch, which incorporates the Fingerprint, Photographic and Scenes of Crime Examination Services.

The importance of having a National Fingerprint Collection has been recognised by all police forces in the United Kingdom even though they have their own local fingerprint bureaux.

Each day, the fingerprints of people who have been sentenced to a term of imprisonment, and those who have been arrested and charged with other than the most minor offences, are sent to New Scotland Yard for processing. The fingerprints of those who are not subsequently convicted are, of course, destroyed.

One of the primary functions of the National Fingerprint Office is to establish whether the person has a previous record. After a name check has been made, the enquiry fingerprints are compared with the master set of any suggested match. If this proves negative, the fingerprints are coded and the coding transmitted to the Police National Computer at Hendon.

The coding of the enquiry prints is analysed by the computer and only those criminals whose prints could possibly match are listed as respondents on a computer print-out.

Until recently, Identification Officers would make a comparison of the enquiry with the paper fingerprint forms of the respondents, which are all filed in the National Fingerprint Collection, in order to establish whether any computer suggestion was positive.

However, after some years of research and planning, an automatic retrieval system known as the ‘Videofile System’ was installed and fingerprint comparisons are now made by Identification Officers at Visual Display Units.

These processes, which have eliminated the need for much laborious searching, often result in a rapid reply from the computer indicating that there is no inclusion which matches the coding enquiry fingerprints.

Within the organisation of the Scenes of Crime Branch there operates a field force of 200 Identification Officers and Scenes of Crime Officers who are responsible for examining Scenes of Crime throughout the Metropolitan Police District. Scenes of serious crime are examined for fingerprints by Senior Identification Officers. The function of these officers is to detect and record any finger or palm marks which an offender may have left at the scene. They also retrieve forensic clues, e.g. blood samples, shoe marks, etc., which are then forwarded to the Forensic Science Laboratory for analysis.

Finger and palm marks are sent to the Metropolitan Police Scenes of Crime Branch at New Scotland Yard where, after various elimination and checking procedures, the finger marks are coded for search on either the Police National Computer (Scenes of Crime System) or the Automatic Fingerprint Recognition System (AFR). The suggested possible fingerprint matches may be compared using the Videofile System or by browsing through the actual fingerprint collections. The Automatic Fingerprint Recognition System is a computerised method of matching fingerprints found at scenes of crime with recorded fingerprints of known offenders. The computer lists, in order of probability, any possible fingerprint matches, but does not itself make any ‘identical or not identical’ decisions. Palm marks are retained for comparison with the palm prints of persons suspected of committing the crime. Final comparisons between crime scene marks and offenders’ prints and decisions as to the identity are carried out by Identification Officers.

One of the earliest cases involving the use of fingerprint evidence was in 1905, when a thumb print, left on a cash box at the scene of a murder in Deptford of shopkeepers Mr. & Mrs. Farrow, was identified as belonging to Alfred Stratton, one of two brothers. As a result of this identification they were jointly charged with the crime and subsequently hanged.

Since then, fingerprint identification has played an important role in many major crime investigations, including such cases as the Great Train Robbery in 1963, and the sad case of Lesley Whittle, who was found brutally murdered in a drainage shaft at Kidsgrove in 1975, and the intriguing case of the ‘Stockwell Strangler’, who was responsible for the murders of eleven pensioners in 1986.

Apart from the technical assistance which is given by Fingerprint Staff in the investigation of crime, positive identification by means of fingerprints has given vital help in cases of serious accidents; for example, train and plane crashes. They have also been valuable in identifying people who have suffered from amnesia.

Like any other major organisation, the Identification Services are always seeking ways of improving the service provided. Although computerisation leads to greater efficiency, it cannot replace the individual expertise of trained Identification Officers and the final decision as to identity which is always made by a qualified Fingerprint Expert.

HOW TO COMPARE FINGERPRINTS … A SHORT VIDEO