THE REAL JAMES BOND 007 … CAPTAIN PETER MASON (Winston Churchhill’s post-war secret SAS Baker Team)

THE REAL JAMES BOND “007” – CAPTAIN PETER MASON 

1027856_orig

HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL, FOREST OF DEAN, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, UK …….. WE TOUCH UPON THE MANY INEXTRICABLE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE REAL JAMES BOND 007 , THE UK SPECIAL FORCES AND THE SOE ( SPECIAL OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE ) AMONGST OTHERS

YOU WILL HOPEFULLY ENJOY OUR COLLECTIONS AND DISPLAYS WHICH INCLUDES SIGNED PHOTOGRAPHS OF A GREAT MANY JAMES BOND 007 MOVIE STARS , THE BOND GIRLS , ACTION MAN FIGURES ETC ETC , WHICH ARE ALL ON DISPLAY TOO IN AMONGST ALL THE HISTORICAL EXHIBITS AND EDUCATIONAL INSIGHTS INTO THE UK’S SPECIAL FORCES . 

POLITE WARNING 

PLEASE DO BE AWARE THAT THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GRAPHIC AND EXPLICIT ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBITS AND FEATURES TOO IN AMONGST THESE DISPLAYS 

51SDEN9CH9L._SY300_Captain Peter Mason is a former member of the post-war SAS Baker Team who were issued a licence to kill by the British government.

Mason was involved in the mission to seek out and ‘remove’ Nazi Special Forces who had followed out orders to execute captured British forces during the Second World War.[1]

His experiences and knowledge of the spy world was influential in the creation of the fictitious spy James Bond. Creator Ian Fleming was a friend of Mason and would consult him on the gadgets and methods used during the period. Gadgets used by Mason are part of a display at the Combined Military Services Museum in Maldon, Essex. The items on show were all used by spies of all sides during the Cold War period of the 1950s and ’60s.

————————————————————————————————————

This excellent documentary  footage posted below does advance the realization that what Royal Navy Commander Ian Fleming wrote about in his James Bond, secret agent 007 novels was indeed, REAL.

However, to do this, it advances the false premise that Fleming had to look at other men for his inspiration when the truth is that HE WAS A SPY, A COMMANDO as well as an intelligence operative. Fleming worked for MI6 BEFORE WW2 when working for Reuters (owned by MI6) and after WW2 as head of Kelmsley Newspaper’s Foreign Department under the cover as a journalist. During WW2, Fleming went on several missions as either a spy or as a Commando while the 2IC of Naval Intelligence. He participated in the Royal Navy Reserves until at least 1951. Who does that sound like?

James Bond.

Ian Fleming was James Bond.

James Bond is REAL.

—————————————————————————————————————-

as reported in the Sunday Times

The Sunday Times, London, Dec. 28, 1997

British Hit Squad ‘executed’ Nazis

by Nicholas Hellen, Media Correspondent

BRITISH SOLDIERS WERE secretly assigned to hunt and kill Nazi criminals after the second world war, according to a member of a special unit who claims he personally executed 16 Germans.

Peter Mason, 73, has described how he was recruited in May 1945 to avenge the deaths of Special Operations Executive (SOE) spies murdered in concentration camps and SAS men shot by the SS as saboteurs. The mission was intended to punish war criminals not prominent enough to face justice at Nuremberg and other trials conducted by the allies at the end of the war.

In the euphoria after VE day, the British Government was reluctant to rake over some of the war’s goriest episodes publicly. Disclosure of the Hunter-killer units would have undermined the legitimacy ensured by the war trials. The capture of German military records in Strasbourg, however made secret revenge possible on men who might otherwise have vanished. Mason, who led the unit killing Nazis until 1948, initially mounted his covert sorties from a converted stable block in the Black Forest village of Wildbad near Stuttgart, under Major Eric Barkworth, of 2 SAS, who sent him regular instructions by dispatch rider.

Independent historical research has already shown that Barkworth oversaw a separate less sensitive mission to arrest German war criminals from a base at Gaggenau, near Wildbad. Mason claims his activities were funded secretly by the War Office and were approved by Churchill. There was a hiatus of several months after the election of the Labour government before the unit’s activities resumed.

Mason said last week, that the unit’s preferred method was to collect the Nazis from prison camps, on the pretext that they were required to give evidence at Nuremberg. He and his fellow soldiers would check their identities and confront them with a file listing their atrocities before executing them. He said: “All the SS were tattooed with their number.Some used battery acid to try and burn it off and conceal themselves. If you saw a big scar, you knew who they were. They would fold up when they were shown the evidence.”

Mason and his comrades, Nobby Clark and Josef Galinsky, killed their targets using German guns, including the Walther P381 pistol and the Luger P08, to make it appear that they had committed suicide. Alternatively Mason would claim that they had been shot attempting to escape.

The Germans’ bodies were bundled into a hidden compartment in a Czech-built vehicle and dumped at a British camp. The unit was armed with Colt 45 pistols, M1 carbines and Thompson sub machineguns. Mason, a firearms expert, met Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, in 1959 and inspired him to equip the fictional spy with silenced weapons. Fleming later sent Mason a minature dagger as a token of appreciation.

The most notorious victim of the SAS unit was Otto Ortegies, a Hitler Youth leader, who was suspected of killing two British secret agents: He is said have castrated them and left them to bleed to death from telegraph poles. Mason and his fellow soldiers traced Ortgies to a Munich hotel room and led him out to be shot.

The story of the revenge mission is to be told in Master Spies, to be screened on Discovery Channel on January 11.

Mason, who once escorted Anthony Blunt, the traitor to Germany to retrieve letters by the Duke of Windsor will disclose further exploits in a book to be published this summer by Phillips Publicationstions, of New Jersey. Jim Phillips, owner of the publishing company, claims he has documents that authenicate Mason’s story. One water damaged sheet of paper is dated May 8,1945, and starnped with the marks 2 SAS and the initials AG3 V W.

Mason, who wishes to keep secret his address in North America, maintains he has no regrets about his role as assassin. “I am proud of what I did,” he said.

Sunday Times 28 December 1997

————————————————————————————————————-

WHEN REALITY BECOMES A TIMELESS FICTION – IAN FLEMMING AUTHOR OF THE GREAT MANY JAMES BOND 007 BOOKS WHICH HAVE SUBSEQUENTLY BECOME ICONIC FILMS

ianflemingDM0102_468x440

THE ACTORS WHO HAVE PLAYED JAMES BONDJames Bond-1525126 James_Bond_35838

———————————————————————————————————-

SOME OF THE GORGEOUS LADIES WHO HAVE PLAYED BOND GIRLS

bond-girls BondGirlsMontage

——————————————————————————————————

SOME OF THE MANY ACTORS WHO HAVE PLAYED BOND VILLAINS

james_bond_villains

SAS “WHO DARES WINS “AND UK SPECIAL FORCES EXHIBITION AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION, LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

THE UK’S ONLY ONE OF IT’S KIND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 

 

PLEASE DO BE AWARE THAT THIS EXHIBITION IS ON DISPLAY HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION, LITTLEDEAN JAIL ALONGSIDE AND IN AMONGST A LARGELY CLUTTERED (ALADDIN’S CAVE)  ARRAY OF OTHER EXHIBITION AREAS THAT TOUCH UPON TRUE CRIME, MURDERABILIA, SLEAZE AND SCANDAL, THE BIZARRE AND THE TABOO . 

WE ARE IN THE MAIN A VERY POLITICALLY INCORRECT CRIME MUSEUM AND VISITOR ATTRACTION THAT CONTAINS A VAST AMOUNT OF VERY GRAPHIC AND EXPLICIT MATERIAL WHICH SOME VISITORS WILL UNDOUBTEDLY FIND DISTURBING AND OFFENSIVE .

SO…. AS WE ALWAYS SAY AS A POLITE WARNING….. IF EASILY OFFENDED , DISTURBED OR OF A SENSITIVE NATURE …. THEN PLEASE DO AVOID VISITING LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

—————————————————————————————————-

SAS VETERAN  OF THE  STORMING OF THE IRANIAN EMBASSY SIEGE ON THE 5 MAY 1980, 1972 BATTLE OF MIRBAT, NORTHERN IRELAND AND FALKLANDS WAR…   PETE WINNER SOLDIER “I” … AS FEATURED HERE AT THE SAS AND SPECIAL UK FORCES EXHIBITION .

HERE ARE SOME BRIEF VIDEO BACKGROUND FOOTAGE RELATING TO PETE WINNER SOLDIER “I” , HIS VISIT AND PERSONAL CONTRIBUTIONS FOR OUR EXHIBITION HERE.

soldierI014

soldierI016

JSN_9610

soldier-I-241

THE RISE AND FALL OF EVIL TYRANT IDI AMIN DADA…ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST EVIL MEN

775244_orig zzIdiAminBikini

IDI  AMIN DADA- EVIL WARLORD

Idi  Amin Dada was the third President of Uganda from 1971 to 1979. Amin joined the British colonial regiment, the King’s African Rifles in 1946, serving in Somalia, Kenya and Uganda.

uganda-idi-amin-murdered-oppositionuganda-victims-amin

Uganda: How the West brought Idi Amin to power   That Idi Amin was a brutal dictator of extraordinary cruelty is well known and becomes more so as the tally of his victims, according to conventional accounts, topped over 100,000 between 1971-75. What is less known is the role of the British government and its allies not only in maintaining Amin’s machinery of repression but in actually establishing him in power. Although Amin later became alienated from his Western friends, we can show here that the break between him and Britain became complete only when his fall (on April 10, 1979) was imminent, and that regarding him as the least evil option from the point of view of British interests, London actively helped keep him in power. The tale of how the Western powers took measures to reverse the decline of their fortunes in Africa during the 1960s is complex in detail but simple in principle. In Uganda, once dubbed the Pearl of Africa by Winston Churchill, huge British financial, industrial and agricultural interests were under threat from the Obote government. Unease about Obote’s intentions was combined with attempts by outside interests to ingratiate themselves. Obote accepted aid from the Israel government, which was desperately trying to avoid total diplomatic isolation while being used as a proxy by the United States in countries where its own reputation was tarnished. The Americans and Israelis worked in very close co-operation in Uganda, particularly through their respective intelligence agencies, the CIA and Mossad. Washington provided some development aid while Israeli troops trained the Ugandan army and airforce. The British economic and political presence was always predominant and this was one of the situations that Obote hoped to change. Throughout the late 1960s, Obote was consolidating his personal power and introducing legislation that was to shake the colonial interests. Although Obote was no Fidel Castro or Julius Nyerere [president ofTanzania], his Common Man’s Charterand the nationalisation of 80 British companies were not welcome in London. As one prominent commentator put it: The Obote government was on the point of changing not only the constitution but the whole political system when [Amin’s] coup occurred. A vital source of raw materials, Uganda was not about to be permitted to determine its own political development at the expense of the entrenched interests. Soon, plans were being laid by Britain in combination with Israel and America to remedy this situation. The grand plan The first task was to choose Obote’s possible successor, and Idi Amin proved an obvious choice. Known by the British as a little short on the grey matter thoughintensely loyal to Britain, his qualifications were superb. He had started his career as a non-commissioned officer in the British colonial regiment, the King’s African Rifles, and later served in the British suppression of Kenyan nationalists in the late 1950s (mistakenly known as the Mau Mau rebellion). In Uganda itself, Amin had helped form the General Service Units (the political police) and had even chosen the presidential bodyguard. Some have said Amin was being groomed for power as early as 1966 (four years after Ugandan independence on October 9, 1962), but the plotting by the British and others began in earnest in 1969 when Obote started his nationalisation program. The plotting was based in southern Sudan, in the midst of a tribe that counted Amin among its members. Here, the Israel government had been supporting a secessionist movement called the Anya-Nya against the Arab-leaning Sudanese government, in an effort to divert Arab military forces from Israel’s western front with Egypt during the no peace, no war period of the Arab-Israeli conflict… The Amin coup Just a few days before the coup, 700 British troops arrived in neighbouring Kenya. Although they were apparently scheduled to arrive long before, The Sunday Expressspeculated that they would be used to put down anti-British riots following the decision of the British Conservative government to sell weapons to apartheid South Africa, remarking that the presence of the troops, seemingly co-incidental—could prove providential. The paper added that the British troops would be used if trouble for Britons and British interests starts. The report was followed two days later, still before the coup, by strenuous denials. When the coup took place, Obote was attending the Commonwealth conference in Singapore. He was aware that the internal situation in Uganda was not to his advantage and went to the conference only because President Nyerere of Tanzania had impressed on him the importance of being there to help present effective opposition to the British government’s arms sales to apartheid South Africa. The African members of the Commonwealth were piling the pressure on the British government. At a meeting with Zambia’s Presidents Kaunda, Nyerere and Obote, British Prime Minister Edward Heath was threatened with the withdrawal of those countries from the Commonwealth should the South African arms decision go through. During this tempestuous meeting, Heath is reported to say: I wonder how many of you will be allowed to return to your own countries from this conference. When Amin finally struck, the British press claimed that a Ugandan sergeant-major operating a telephone exchange had overheard a conversation concerning plans by Obote supporters in the army to move against Amin. Upon hearing the news, Amin moved into action, quickly seizing all strategic points in Uganda. Apart from the fact that the army would not have attempted to remove Amin in the absence of Obote, this version ignores the British and Israeli plans. On Amin’s accession to power, all was sweetness and light between him and the British establishment. Britain very quickly recognised Amin’s regime, exactly one week after the coup. And he was hailed as a conquering hero in the British press. But even the US government considered the British recognition of Amin as showing unseemly haste. In London, The Times commented: The replacement of Dr Obote by General Amin was received with ill-concealed relief in Whitehall. Other British press comments included, Good luck to General Amin (the Daily Telegraph); Military men are trained to act. Not for them the posturing of the Obotes and Kaundas who prefer the glory of the international platform rather than the dull but necessary tasks of running a smooth administration (the Daily Express); and more in the same vein. Not surprisingly, Amin supported Edward Heath’s stand on selling arms to apartheid South Africa, breaking the unified opposition of the states at the Singapore Commonwealth conference. Amin also denationalised several of the British companies taken over under Obote, and in July 1971 came to London where he had lunch with the queen and meetings with Heath’s cabinet. But the seeds of discord between Britain and Amin were being sown as he began to fail to live up to their expectations of servility. After the coup, Uganda was granted 10 million pounds in economic aid (to be administered by Britain), in addition to 15 Ferret and 36 Saladin armoured cars, other military equipment and a training team for the Ugandan army. However, Amin resented the fact that Britain would not give him fighter aircraft and other sophisticated equipment to help his expansionist ambitions. In particular, Amin had plans for an invasion of Tanzania, so that he could have a port on the east coast of his own. For help in this project, which was becoming an obsession, Amin then turned to Israel. He asked for Phantom jet fighters and other sophisticated weapons, permission for which would have been required from the US government. Saying that the request went beyond the requirements of legitimate self-defence, Israel refused Amin, which probably was a factor in the expulsion of the Israelis from Uganda in April 1972. Although short of the hardware necessary, Amin was well supplied with strategic advice. This came from another collaborator with British intelligence, a British major who lived on the Kagera River, on the border with Tanzania, where Amin used to come to visit him frequently by helicopter. This former officer in the Seaforth Highlanders had been a member of the International Commission of Observers sent to the Nigeria civil war to investigate charges of genocide, but he was sacked amid allegations that he had offered his services to the Nigerian federal government as a mercenary. But at a National Insurance Tribunal in England, where he was protesting his dismissal and claiming compensation, the major explained that his real role in Nigeria was to collect intelligence for the British government and offer strategic military advice to the Nigerian federal forces. In spite of strenuous denials from the Foreign Office, the tribunal accepted the major’s story and described him as a frank and honest witness. It is not known whether the major’s activities on behalf of Amin were officially sanctioned by the British government, or parts of it, but his role seems to have been similar to the part he played in Nigeria. At any rate, the major took Amin’s invasion plan of Tanzania seriously, undertaking spying missions to Tanzania to reconnoitre the defences and terrain in secret. He supplied Amin with a strategic and logistical plan to the best of his abilities, and although lack of hardware was an obstacle, evidence that Amin never gave up the idea came in the fact that the invasion of Uganda by Tanzanian and exiled Ugandan anti-Amin forces in late 1978 which eventually brought his rule to an end on April 10, 1979, was immediately preceded by an abortive invasion of Tanzania by Amin’s army. In the manner which characterised the major’s behaviour after the Nigerian episode, he did not maintain discretion when back in England. He wanted to publish his story of cooperation with Amin in the Daily Express, but this was scotched by an interesting move by the British government — a D-Notice banning the story on grounds of national security. US support Beginning with his purges of the army, later extending them to those who had carried out the purges, the ferocity and cruelty of Amin’s rule increased steadily—most of it performed by the dreaded Public Safety Unit, the State Research Centre and various other bodies. These received training assistance and supplies from Britain and the US. In July 1978, the US columnist Jack Anderson revealed that 10 of Amin’s henchmen from the Public Safety Unit were trained at the International Police Academy in the exclusive Washington suburb of Georgetown. The CIA-run academy was responsible for training police officers from all over the world until its closure in 1975. Three of the Ugandans continued their studies at a graduate school, also run by the CIA, called the International Police Services Inc. Shortly after the Amin coup, the CIA had one full-time police instructor stationed in Uganda. Controversy raged in the United States in the use of equipment sold to Uganda. Twelve of these were police helicopter pilots for American Bell helicopters that had been delivered in 1973. Security equipment of various types also found its way to Uganda from Britain, and most came as a result of the groundwork done by another collaborator of British intelligence, Bruce Mackenzie, an ex-RAF pilot and long-serving adviser to President Kenyatta of Kenya. Mackenzie also doubled as the East African agent for a giant British electronics firm, based in London, dealing in telecommunications. Trade in radio transmitters and other devices continued right up to Amin’s fall from power. Though Mackenzie had died when a bomb planted by Amin’s police exploded in his private plane, the trade with the electronics firm continued nonetheless. Several times a week, Ugandan Airlines’ planes would touch down at Stansted Airport in Essex, England, to unload quantities of tea and coffee and take on board all the necessary supplies for Amin’s survival. In spite of all the revelations of the nature of Amin’s dictatorship and his dependency on the Stansted shuttle, it continued right up to February 1979, when the British government ended it in an extraordinary piece of opportunism. The chief advantage of the shuttle to Amin was that it obviated the need for foreign exchange, for which Uganda had virtually none. In June 1977, the Sunday Times revealed that the Ugandan planes to Stansted were picking up Land Rovers (28 were delivered), one of them specially converted and bristling with sophisticated electronic equipment for monitoring broadcasts, jamming and other capabilities. The cargo spotlighted by the Sunday Times also included a mobile radio studio, which is almost certainly where Amin was continuing to assert over the airwaves that he was in control long after he had been ousted from Kampala. At the same time, an extensive relationship between Uganda and the Crown Agents, the trading agency with strong links in Britain’s former colonies, was exposed. Crown Agents had arranged a deal for Amin to buy 120 three-ton trucks made in Luton. The trucks were thought to have been converted for military purposes before being shipped out. The British firm that supplied the electronic equipment and another firm in the same field had also supplied Amin’s State Research Centre with telephone-tapping equipment, night-vision devices, burglar alarms and anti-bomb blankets. When the Liberal MP David Steel questioned Labour Party Prime Minister Jim Callaghan about this, all that the prime minister had to say was that the devices wereintended to track down television licence dodgers. To add to this, it was said that after the Entebbe raid by Israeli troops, the radar damaged there was sent to England for repair. The principal value of the Stansted shuttle was to maintain Amin’s system of privileges, vital for retaining the allegiance of the Ugandan army. His power elite, consisting of army officers not subject to the stringent rationing imposed on the rest of the population, depended on the goods brought in on the Stansted shuttle. During times of the frequent and widespread shortages of basic commodities linked to inflation of around 150%, the officers could use the British goods to make their fortunes on the black market. A further aspect of the Stansted shuttle involved British, US and Israeli intelligence: this was in the provision of the planes. According to the Washington Post’s Bernard Nossiter, Pan Am was instructed by the CIA to sell several Boeing 707s to a New York-based Israeli company with former US defence department connections. The company was owned by an Israeli multimillionaire with a vast commercial empire. The company sold one of the Boeings to a small firm based in Switzerland, which passed the plane on to Amin in May 1976. The function of the Swiss-based company was to act as a laundry for the financing of projects backed by Israeli intelligence. In 1977, the Israeli company which had originally bought the plane from Pan Am, wanted to sell another Boeing to Uganda Airlines, but with the notoriety of Amin’s regime getting worse, the company feared losing the US State Department approval it had won for the first deal. The plane was thus sold to another company housed in the same building in New York as the Israeli company, which then leased the plane to Uganda Airlines. The two companies had close ties, and the purpose of this extraordinary generosity was to spy on the Libyan military airfield in Benghazi, where the planes always refuelled before going on to Stansted. Both Israeli and US intelligence provided navigators for the planes to spy on the airfield and make reports which were shared out among Israeli, US and British intelligence agencies. The information was probably of very little use, since the Libyans almost certainly knew of the presence of the navigators on the planes. But Amin was getting a very cheap service for the coffee and tea bound for London and the other goods that returned. Washington also provided pilots for the planes. A California-based company supplied the pilots acting as a subcontractor. Britain, a friend to the last In general, the British government’s attitude to Amin’s regime was neatly summed up by The Times when Amin had just expelled Uganda’s Asians on August 9, 1972: The irony is that if President Amin were to disappear, worse might ensueThe Timessaid. In a similar comment, exemplifying the relationship with Amin as being the devil you know, The Economist stated: The last government to want to be rid of Amin is the British one. This attitude persisted even beyond the break in Ugandan-British diplomatic relations in July 1976, as shown by the fact that the Stansted shuttle continued. Important political commentators in the British press believed that London would not impose sanctions on Uganda under Amin, since this might set a precedent for sanctions against apartheid South Africa. Britain plainly considered the bad image consequent on maintaining links with Amin not as serious as the consequences of breaking links with South Africa. Nonetheless, as the body count of Amin’s victims—former friends, members of the clergy, soldiers and mostly ordinary people—mounted daily, stock should have been taken of those who helped Amin stay where he was and turned a blind eye to the amply documented brutality of his regime. Thirty years on, no such stock has been taken and Amin continues to be cast as thedemented dictator who had no friends

SAS TRAINING REGIME – DEEMED TO BE THE HARDEST ARMY SELECTION PROCESS IN THE WORLD .

SAS EXHIBITION AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL …..

IF IN THE AREA (FOREST OF DEAN, GLOUCESTERSHIRE) DO COME VISIT AND SEE OUR OWN UNIQUE AND ALWAYS EXPANDING SAS EXHIBITION WHICH IS NOW PART OF OUR TERRORISM AND COUNTER-TERRORISM COLLECTIONS ON DISPLAY HERE AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

PLEASE DO BE AWARE THAT SUCH MATERIAL IS VERY SCARCE TO SOURCE AND OBTAIN  … FOR OBVIOUS REASONS. SO PLEASE DO NOT EXPECT TO SEE A MASS OF SUCH EXHIBIT MATERIAL HERE ON DISPLAY . WE ONLY PROVIDE A VERY BRIEF INSIGHT INTO THIS STILL VERY MUCH SECRETIVE BRITISH ARMY UNIT .

Special Air Service

The Special Air Service (SAS) is the principal special forces organisation of the British Army. Formed in 1941 to conduct raids behind German lines in North Africa, with the Long Range Desert Group, it today serves as a model for similar units fielded by many other countries.

The SAS is a small and secretive organisation, but attracts a disproportionate amount of media coverage. It forms part of the United Kingdom Special Forces, alongside the Special Boat Service (SBS) and the Special Reconnaissance Regiment (SRR).

The SAS is widely regarded as one of the finest and best trained special forces units in the world.

Active:   July 1947-
Type: Special Forces
Country: United Kingdom
Branch: Army
Role: Counter Revolutionary Warfare/Counter Terrorism
(one regiment)Close Target Reconnaissance (two regiments)
Garrison/HQ: Hereford (22nd Regiment)
London (21st Regiment)
Wolverhampton (23rd Regiment)
Colonel in Chief: Colonel of the Regiment:
General The Rt Hon Charles Ronald Llewellyn (Guthrie), Baron Guthrie, GCB, LVO, OBE, ADC
Nickname: The Regiment
Motto: Who Dares Wins

Hardest Training in the World: SAS (Special Air Service)

So you might have heard from somewhere that SAS training involves being spun around in a chair blind-folded and then dropped into a pool in the dark where you have to swim to the surface. Is this true? Do the SAS really ‘’shoot to kill’’ and is there any point taking the test when the training motto from their superiors goes like, ‘’we don’t try to fail you – we try to kill you’’?

An SAS trooper has to survive one of the toughest and most rigorous training processes in the world. I want to disperse any myths and go behind enemy lines and into the heart of the SAS training regime.

There are 3 main training stages:

1. Selection: designed to weed out the men who do not have the mental or physical stamina required by the regiment.
2. Jungle training: designed to see whether the men have the tactical and operational skills to function in this elite force under extreme conditions.
3. Survival training: designed to see whether the men can overcome interrogation and learn to survive on their wits and the surrounding environment.

To be considered for selection, a hopeful must have at least three months experience in their own regiment and at least three years left to serve. The selection ordeal will last four weeks, with three build-up weeks and one test week. Many have tried and even more have failed, it’s notoriously tough as you will see.

There are two selections a year, one in winter and the other in summer. The general idea is that you either suffer from hypothermia in winter, or suffer from heat stroke in summer. I’ve always wondered to myself for some twisted reason that if I was to be stranded and left for dead, would I prefer to be stuck in the hot or the cold? For those about to ask themselves the same, I’d take jungle heat and desert dehydration over frost bite and unforgiving icy mountains.

First the recruits go to Stirling Lines, Hereford to have a medical and pass the Body Fitness Test (BFT). 10% fail here. The rest are issued the equipment that they need for selection. Then they are sent out to the steep Brecon Beacon hills, where selection starts and the ‘fun’ really begins.

1. Selection

Selection is simple. Get from point A to B, from point B to C etc, within a set time frame. Start to finish is typically over 10km away. You may not think 10km is a long distance, but strap 50lbs of Bergen (a heavy-duty British Army rucksack) to your back and have a rethink. Another factor is that the distances the soldiers cover gradually increase each day, as do the loads they bear.

Extremely arduous routes are specifically picked to test their mental and physical limits. SAS operations are undertaken with utmost secrecy so patrols avoid using roads and established routes. Training soldiers get up at 4am every morning and use navigational landmarks to make up ground instead, moving with stealth from feature to feature. The ability of the SAS to march long distances carrying heavy loads into battle is legendary. It’s fundamental to the way the regiment operates.

Climbing the hills at Beacon is all about strengthening the mind and character of a person. After a couple of days, the old equipment the soldiers have been given gets going cutting deep into the skin, giving the men crippling blisters and sores.  Nobody said it was easy. It takes self determination and self discipline; something that is lost in the work place and in people’s lives these days.

Test Week

Test week is the next part of selection and consists of six marches, the first five being 17 miles long requiring the soldier to march with the 501b Bergen on his back while map reading. These stiff seven days culminate in the ‘Long Drag’, a 40-mile march which has to be completed in less than 20 hours. Test week teaches the soldiers to break through mental barriers. The idea can be likened to that of a marathon runner. At some point during a race a marathon runner will hit a plateau, where physically they have no reserves left in their body but still fight through and keep on going, such is the strength of their will and determination. The SAS endurance is equivalent to running two marathons. Don’t forget the Bergen.

What’s more and something that is unique to the SAS unlike any other Special Force in the world is that selection is carried out alone. There is nobody in selection shouting encouragement – the soldier is left to motivate themselves. There are no instructors shouting at you to do better, or mates encouraging you not to drop out. The only person forcing you to go through hell is you. Direct Staff (DC’s) simply watch as the soldiers fight to survive. It is no doubt the ultimate way to instil self motivation and to strengthen a person’s will.

2. Jungle training

Jungle training is carried out immediately after selection and it lasts four weeks. The extreme conditions of the jungle make this phase of training one of the most physically demanding for potential recruits. The heat, humidity, insects and wildlife make it a completely inhospitable environment. Carrying barely enough to sustain you for 14 days in the blazing conditions is mind-blowing.

An SAS candidate must mentally and physically overcome shock if he is to survive. It is the true test of mental toughness; not to crack under intense pressure.  It is here an SAS prospect receives all the knowledge he needs to fight in the jungle. I suspect those with emotional baggage will not fair too well under the vines especially with the long claustrophobic nights playing havoc with their ability to deal with what is required.

The training soldiers will be wet all the time, even out of the water, due to sweating in the scorching heat. It’s a very strange place the jungle but I sense the reason behind this phase of training is that if you can soldier on in the jungle environment you can be a soldier in any environment.

3. Survival training

The equipment the soldiers carry is crucial to their combat effectiveness. Typically one will carry rations, spare ammunition, spare batteries for radio/torches, night sights and claymores (not the drink although spirits are sometimes used to treat wounds), which have the scary ability to fire 300 metal balls 100 metres shredding everything in their way.

Interrogation

Interrogation is designed to explore the ‘’inner-man’’. It’s not enough being physically as hard as nails if you’re mental and emotional strengths are weak. Unbelievable. This session comes after days and nights of sleep deprivation, nutrient deprivation and physical degradation due to the extreme harsh and unnatural way of living. Showing any emotion in this stage will mean total failure. Add the psychological games the SAS use to induce delirium and the fact that there’s no way of really knowing the darker details without having gone through training yourself and suddenly your and my idea of what the training must be like comes across as a rather irrelevant term for consideration. The SAS train consistently to give them the edge in all contact situations. It’s this level of training that makes a Special Forces unit and the SAS one of the most elite out of all the Special Forces in the world.

Those who survive the selection and training are badged (in a ceremonial moment of anticlimax where the recruit simply swaps his beret.) They are now officically an SAS soldier.

It takes this much to be the best in the world. And it takes much more to remain the best.

WHO DARES WINS ….. OUR HEROIC SPECIAL AIR SERVICE (SAS) & BEYOND HERE AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL

JSN_2399

ABOVE IS A COPY  OF A NUMBERED LIMITED EDITION PRINT OF THE ARTWORK ENTITLED “OPERATION NIMROD” – STORMING OF THE IRANIAN EMBASSY , ON THE 05TH MAY 1980 , WHICH HAS BEEN SIGNED BY A GREAT NUMBER OF THE LEADING FIGURES INVOLVED . A LABOUR OF LOVE TO HAVE EVEN GOT SO MANY SIGNATURES IN THE 1ST INSTANCE  FROM A SERVING SAS SOLDIER .CERTAINLY A FABULOUS ITEM NOW ON DISPLAY TOO HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION, LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

OT FORGETTING OF COURSE OUR OTHER UK SPECIAL FORCES . PAST AND PRESENT. HOPEFULLY WELL WORTH A VISIT FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN THIS SUBJECT MATTER .

Embassy Siege header 600

599777_511387605563329_80944967_n

iranian_embassy_siege_240x320 Iranian-embassy-siege-007 sas_1467122c

HERE BELOW ARE SOME INTERESTING AND EDUCATIONAL IN DEPTH DOCUMENTARY FOOTAGE INTO THEIR ROLE IN COUNTER TERRORISM HERE IN THE UK

ABOUT THE SAS

The SAS (Special Air Service) Regiment is a corps of the British Army and a part of the United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) commanded by the Director Special Forces. The SAS Regiment actually refers to three regiments known as the 21st SAS Regiment, 22nd SAS Regiment and 23rd SAS Regiment. The 22nd SAS Regiment is a part of the Regular Army, while the 22nd and 23 regiments are a part of the reserve Territorial Army.

History of the SAS Regiment dates back to the Second World War when David Stirling founded the so-called L Detachment, Special Air Service Brigade which was used to operate behind the enemy lines in North Africa. It was not a paratroop regiment with a number of units like its name suggested but it was intentionally given a misleading name so that the Axis would think that they are dealing with a number of units rather than one commando unit. For most of the war, the Stirling’s unit operated in North Africa and the Greek islands although it also fought in Sicily and Italy, and later in Western Europe. However, it was reorganized several times by 1944 when it supported the Allied advance towards Germany and meanwhile got a new commander – Paddy Mayne. He replaced David Stirling who was captured by the Germans in Tunisia in 1943. Stirling was held prisoner by the end of the war although he escaped several times before the Germans moved him to an “escape-proof” castle in the town of Colditz, Germany.

After the end of the Second World War, the British government decided that there is no need for a special air service regiment any longer and disbanded the existing 1st and 2nd SAS regiments joined in the SAS Brigade. However, the government soon changed its mind and a new SAS regiment was raised in less than two years after the end of the war. In 1952, the British government also decided to form a Regular Army SAS regiment and added the Squadron 2 (Malay Scouts) to the army list as the 22nd SAS Regiment. In 1959, another regiment – the 23rd SAS Regiment was formed and became a part of the reserve Territorial Army.

From its formal formation in 1952, the 22nd SAS Regiment carried out a number of operations in many parts of the world. But its best known action was the so-called Operation Nimrod which was carried out during the Iranian Embassy Siege in London in 1980. In a 17 minute action, the soldiers of the SAS Regiment rescued 24 from the remaining 25 hostages and killed 5 out of 6 terrorists without losing a single man.

The members of the 22nd SAS Regiment are recruited from the UK armed forces although most of the SAS soldiers come from the airborne forces. In order to be accepted to the Regiment, the candidates have to pass a number of tests and exercises during a five-week long selection process that is held twice per year in Sennybridge in Brecon Beacons. From about 200 pre-selected candidates, only about 30 pass the selection process. The selection for the 21st and 23rd SAS regiments is less difficult although the standards for admission are quite high as well.

PC DAVID RATHBAND SHOT AT POINT BLANK AND BLINDED BY GUNMAN RAOUL MOAT ON JULY 4TH 2010

HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL WE FEATURE HEROINES AND HERO’S OF OUR BRITISH POLICE FORCE , UK SPECIAL FORCES , EMERGENCY SERVICES AND BEYOND . HOPEFULLY PROVIDING VISITORS WITH A HISTORICALLY INTRIGUING AND EDUCATIONAL INSIGHT INTO THOSE THAT SEEK TO PROTECT OUR COUNTRY .

PERSONALLY SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF BLINDED PC DAVID RATHBAND  ON DISPLAY AT LITTLEDEAN JAILCLOSE-UP OF HANDWRITING AND SIGNATURE OF PC DAVID RATHBAND 

PERSONALLY SIGNED PICTURE OF BLINDED PC DAVID RATHBAND ON DISPLAY AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL
CLOSE-UP OF HANDWRITING AND SIGNATURE OF PC DAVID RATHBANDCLOSE-UP OF PC DAVID RATHBAND AFTER BEING SHOT BY RAUL MOAT ON THE 03RD JULY 2010

‘He got two shots… he was a bit of a mess’: Killer Raoul Moat’s sick boast after shooting Pc in the face

Callous killer Raoul Moat bragged how he left policeman David Rathband looking ‘a bit of a mess’ and then threatened to start killing innocent members of the public, his inquest has heard.

Moat, 37, shot and blinded Pc Rathband, 43, after blasting him twice from point-blank range with a sawn-off shotgun as the defenceless officer sat in his traffic car at a roundabout.

In a series of chilling Dictaphone recordings, later recovered by police from the makeshift camp he set up in the Northumberland countryside, Moat recalls the shooting of Pc Rathband.

‘I’m not fussed about not killing him,’ he says. ‘I didn’t think I had killed him anyway. I was going to go along and finish him off but that’s not the point. He got two shots.

‘At the end of the day he’s looking a bit of a mess.’

Pc David Rathband
Raoul Moat, from Fenham, shot himself in the head and was fired at twice during the stand-off by officers armed with shotgun Tasers

Attack: Callous gunman Raoul Moat, right, described victim Pc Rathband’s face as a ‘bit of a mess’, left

A handout video still issued by Northumbria Police of Raoul Moat during his stand-off with police in Rothbury, Northumberland, in July 2010A handout video still issued by Northumbria Police of Raoul Moat during his stand-off with police in Rothbury, Northumberland, in July 2010

Moat acknowledged the Pc was not one of the officers he accused of ‘pushing’ him.

‘The officers know who they are, some of the officers have gone into hiding,’ he claimed in the tape.

Moat also said he would ‘take the shoot-out’ rather than go back to jail, an inquest heard today.

The gunman was on the run from police following the shootings of karate instructor Chris Brown, his ex-girlfriend Samantha Stobbart and Pc David Rathband when he made the vow.

In the message, the 37-year-old said he had lost the only two people who mattered to him – his grandmother and Miss Stobbart.

He said if he returned to jail he would have ‘nothing to come out to’ and that a shoot-out would mean ‘everybody’s happy’.

Raoul Moat, who died last year following a shooting spree in which he killed Chris Brown, and shot his former partner Samantha Stobbart and PC David Rathband
Former girlfriend of gunman Raoul Moat Samantha Stobbart

Conversation: Jurors listened to a recording of a telephone conversation Raoul Moat, left, had from Durham Prison to girlfriend Samantha Stobbart, pictured right today, on June 10 last year where she told him: ‘It’s over.’

Police officers photographed negotiating with fugitive Raoul Moat, circled, shortly before his death in Rothbury, West YorkshirePolice officers photographed negotiating with fugitive Raoul Moat, circled, shortly before his death in Rothbury, Northumberland
Police attempting to negotiate with Raoul Moat who shot himself in the head after a six-hour stand off Armed police attempting to negotiate with Raoul Moat who shot himself in the head after a six-hour stand off

The message was read out to the inquest at Newcastle Crown Court by Superintendent Jim Napier, the Northumbria Police officer in charge of the criminal investigation into Moat’s rampage.

He told John Beggs, cross-examining for Northumbria Police, that the recordings revealed Moat considered himself to have lost the only two adults he cared about.

In the message, Moat said: ‘If I went to jail now, I could hack it because I have lost everything and I have nothing to come out to.

‘I have come out and got my vengeance. I have set Sam up for life, financially at least. But it is not really what I want.

Raoul Moat, from Fenham, shot himself in the head and was fired at twice during the stand-off by officers armed with shotgun Tasers
Samantha Stobbart

Moat, left, killed his love rival Chris Brown, 29, in Birtley, Gateshead, in July last year, then blasted his ex-lover Samantha Stobbart, 22, right, leaving her in a critical condition

‘IT’S OVER’: THE CONVERSATION WHICH TRIGGERED MOAT’S RAMPAGE

Durham Prison

Moat had this conversation from Durham Prison, pictured right, with Samantha Stobbart

He is heard asking her ‘what’s wrong?’

‘It’s over’, she replies.

‘Over what?’, he asks her.

‘I’ve had enough,’ she replies.

‘Of what?’, Moat asks.

‘Everything,’ she replied.

Moat adds: ‘We had one argument the other day. Let’s not get all silly about it.’

He complains that ‘everybody is getting on my case’ and that he is being ‘picked on’.

The conversation ends with the phone being abruptly slammed down.

‘It would be a waste of a life and a waste of the taxpayer’s money. Just take the shoot-out and everybody’s happy.’

Mr Napier said he took the message as an indication that Moat was contemplating provoking a shoot-out with police.

He said this knowledge informed the police reaction to the gunman when he was cornered.

Nowhere in the messages was there any mention of Moat’s ‘estranged’ family – specifically his tax inspector brother Angus or uncle Charlie Alexander, a former artilleryman, both of whom were at the inquest today.

The killer’s best friend also told the inquest today that Raoul Moat’s ex-lover deliberately wound him up hours before he launched his murderous rampage.

In a phone call Samantha Stobbart told the 37-year-old she was seeing her new boyfriend that night, that she had a new hair-do for the date and asked if he was jealous about it, Anthony Wright told the hearing.

Coroner David Mitford asked: ‘Was she deliberately trying to wind him up?’

Mr Wright, who knew Moat for 14 years from working as doormen together in Newcastle, replied: ‘Oh yes, without a shadow of a doubt.’

Moat had heard while in prison that his relationship with Ms Stobbart was over, and she had told him her new man was younger and could knock him out.

Mr Wright told the hearing: ‘It was almost inevitable that when he got out of prison he was going to look for a straightener with this man.

‘If you knew Raoul it was like a red rag to a bull. I couldn’t work out why she was saying it.’

Barristers for the Moat family, the chief constable of Northumbria Police, West Yorkshire Police officers, and Pro-Tec Limited, the firm that supplied new shotgun Taser weapons, were in court.

The inquest, which is expected to last five weeks, will focus on the events in Rothbury on July 9 and 10 when Moat was found, the coroner said.

There will be questions about weapons used, how police managed the incident, how officers dealt with the dead man and how he acted, the jury was told.

Yesterday the inquest heard how Moat said he was ‘full of beans’ after shooting dead Mr Brown and injuring Miss Stobbart.

Jurors were also played a recording of a phone calls made by Moat from Durham prison in which he was told by Miss Stobbart: ‘It’s over’.

The hearing continues.

love letter from the gun maniac
Moat hid in this storm water drain just yards from villager's homes when he was trying to evade capture from the policeMoat hid in this storm water drain just yards from villagers’ homes when he was trying to evade capture by the police
Steroid addict Raoul Moat shot and blinded Northumbria Police traffic officer PC David Rathband
Chris Brown who was killed by Raul Moat

Steroid addict Raoul Moat shot and blinded Northumbria Police traffic officer PC David Rathband, left, and killed his love rival Chris Brown, right. He also critically injured Samantha Stobbart

Police officers from Northumberland Police Marine Unit search drains near to the scene where gunman Raoul Moat took his own life
Forensic staff at the scene of Raoul Moat's suicide at the riverside in Rothbury after evading capture for a week

Investigation: Police officers from Northumberland Police Marine Unit search drains near to the scene where gunman Raoul Moat took his own life, left, and forensic staff examine evidence at the scene of the suicide

RAOUL MOAT: TIMELINE

Thursday, July 1: Moat is released from Durham prison after serving 18 weeks for assault

Friday, July 2: Prison staff warn police Moat may want to harm Samantha Stobbart

Saturday, July 3: Moat shoots dead Miss Stobbart’s new boyfriend Chris Brown outside her home in Birtley, Gateshead and also injures her. Manhunt is launched for Moat

Sunday, July 4: Pc David Rathband is shot in his patrol car and critically injured. Moat rings officers claiming Miss Stobbart was having an affair with a police officer

Monday, July 5: Manhunt for Moat continues

Tuesday, July 6: Moat’s car is discovered in Rothbury, Northumberland and police flood the area setting up a two-mile exclusion zone. A letter written by Moat reveals his intentions to declare war on the police

Wednesday, July 7: Officers find a tent where Moat had been sleeping and another letter from him

Thursday, July 8: Police say Moat had made threats to the general public and two men were arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender and bailed

Friday, July 9: At 7pm Moat comes out from his hiding place and reporters watch as he lies on the ground with a gun threatening to kill himself. Police try to negotiate with him for six hours

Saturday, July 10: A gunshot is heard at 1.10am and Moat is declared dead after being rushed to hospital. Police said Moat appeared to have killed himself

Armed police stopped hundreds of motorists when they stood guard on the edge of Rothbury during the search for MoatArmed police stopped hundreds of motorists when they stood guard on the edge of Rothbury during the search for Moat
Police officers scoured the countryside for days in the hunt for missing Raoul Moat who went on the run after shooting dead karate instructor Chris Brown, 29, and maiming Moat's ex-girlfriend Samantha StobbartPolice officers scour the countryside in the hunt for Moat after he went missing following the shootings of Chris Brown and Samantha Stobbart
The man-hunt for Moat stretched for miles and went on for days and involved hundreds of police officers The man-hunt for Moat went on for days covering large swathes of the countryside around Rothbury and involved hundreds of police officers

MOAT: ‘I’M NOT COMING IN ALIVE’

The coroner said there would be questions about weapons used and how police managed the incident during the inquestThe coroner said there would be questions about weapons used and how police, pictured trying to negotiate with Moat, managed the incident

The inquest jury heard a recording of a telephone call Moat made in which he threatened to kill Northumbria Police officers.

In the five-minute conversation, made to a police call handler shortly before Moat blasted Northumbria Police traffic officer Pc David Rathband, the gunman said he was ‘not coming in alive’.

He said he had taken two hostages and would kill them and any police officer that approached him.

He said he was sorry he had injured his ex-girlfriend Samantha Stobbart, leaving her in a critical condition in hospital, but blamed police for ‘stitching him up’ and triggering his rampage.

He said he believed karate instructor Chris Brown was a Northumbria Police officer.

He says in the recording: ‘Hello there, this is the gunman from Birtley last night.

‘What I’m phoning about is, is to tell you exactly why I have done what I have done, right?

‘Now, my girlfriend has been having an affair behind my back with one of your officers.

‘This gentleman that I shot last night, the karate instructor, right, now I…

‘Youse bastards have been on to me, right, for years.

‘Youse have hassled us, harassed us, youse just won’t leave us alone.

‘I went straight six years ago when I met her and I have tried my best to have a normal life and you just won’t let up.

‘Youse won’t leave us alone for five minutes.

‘I can’t drive down the street without the blue lights flashing.

‘Youse have stitched us up for years; you have been in court, stitching us up, so the fact of the matter is, right…

‘She has had an affair with one of your officers.

‘If he had not been a police officer, I would not have shot him.’

Talking about his relationship with Miss Stobbart, he said: ‘I have had nothing but grief… But I have had a genuine relationship with her for six years, which is why we have stayed together, and I have gone straight.

‘I have had a totally legit life with her, I have opened a business, and I have been shafted.

‘You police have took too much off me over the years.’

‘Youse won’t leave us alone.

‘And now youse think you can take me missus.’

The call continues: ‘But the fact of the matter is I’m not coming in alive. Youse have hassled me for so many years. If you come anywhere near me I’ll kill youse. I have got two hostages at the moment, right – come anywhere near me and I’ll kill them as well.

‘I’m coming to get youse.
‘I’m not on the run.
‘I’m coming to get you.’

He continues by saying Miss Stobbart had changed while he was in jail.

The call ends: ‘Right. Now I have had enough. I have had enough of youse.
‘That jail made us unwell. I came out a different kid, y’knaa what I mean?

‘I lost everything through youse, right?
‘Youse just won’t leave us alone, right?
‘So at the end of the day, youse killed me and him before that trigger was ever pulled.’

Call handler: ‘Right.’
Moat: ‘Y’knaa what I mean?’
CH: ‘OK.’
Moat: ‘Youse are…’
CH: ‘We are trying to help you.’

Moat: ‘You’re not trying to help us, you’re not trying. Youse wanted me to do myself in and I was going to do it till I found out about him properly and what was going on – and as soon as I found out he was one of your officers I thought, ‘nah, youse have had too much from me’.

‘You will get your chance to kill us, right, you will get your chance to kill us.’

CH: ‘Right, we don’t want to do that, we don’t want to do that.’

Moat: ‘Aye, youse wanted me to kill myself but I’m gonna give youse a chance cos I’m hunting for officers now, right?’

CH: ‘No. Please don’t do that.
‘We don’t want any more killing, all right?’

Moat then hangs up.