HEINRICH HIMMLER – NAZI SS WARLORD,”LORD OF THE RUNES”,THE NAZI OCCULT, ILLUMINATI AND HIS WEWELSBURG CASTLE

BELOW IS  A BRIEF INSIGHT INTO THE NAZI SS AND OCCULT EXHIBITION HERE ON DISPLAY AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL . VERY DIVERSE AND THOUGHT PROVOKING TO SAY THE LEAST .

WE ALSO FEATURE AN INTRIGUING INSIGHT INTO THE WORLD OF THE ILLUMINATI , WITCHCRAFT, THE OCCULT, DEVIL WORSHIP, MYSTERIOUS CELEBRITY DEATHS AND BEYOND

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IMAGE OF BAPHOMET , A FAVOURITE NAZI  OCCULT SYMBOL

 

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BELOW IS LINK TO OUR WEBSITE PAGE WHICH FEATURES MORE INFORMATION, IMAGES AND VIDEOS …. AS IS FEATURED HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

PLEASE CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO ACCESS OUR PAGE 

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Himmler’s SS Mystical castle: Wewelsburg:

 

 

It is said that the Wewelsburg was going to be the “Holy Grail Castle” of the Nazi regime, once it had established itself as rulers of the world. Is this true, and, if so, what was their ambition in this vast building project?

 

It is clear that any Grail Castle to be built would have a geometrical design, and in the case of the Wewelsburg, that is a triangle. For Himmler, the Wewelsburg was not so much the location where the Grail was hidden, but where his Grail Order – the SS, the Schutzstaffel – and its sacred treasures – rumoured to be the Spear of Destiny – would be brought, and from which the magical power of the Nazi regime would radiate out.

The castle was not built by the Nazi regime; its history started several centuries before the National Socialists came to power in 1933. In its current form, the castle was built from 1603 to 1609, as a secondary residence for Fürstbischof Theodor von Fürstenberg, the prince-bishop of Paderborn, whose primary residence was the castle at Neuhaus. However, there existed a castle on the site from the 9th century onwards. At the time, it withheld an invasion of the Huns, its location near what was believed to be the site where the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest occurred. This battle occurred in 9 AD, when various Germanic tribes made an alliance and ambushed and destroyed three Roman legions. The battle was the start of a seven year long war, whereby the Rhine became the boundary of the Roman Empire. It should therefore not come as a surprise that it was seen as a symbol of German unity and a demonstration that a united Germany could conquer all – as it was, of course, felt it would do again….

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The Nazis plans: put into effect by the use of slave labour…

It meant that the estate had the shape of a spear, underlining the unconfirmed belief that the site would become the location where the Spear of Destiny would be held. One story goes that Hitler saw his future when he visited the Museum in Vienna where the Spear was on display, and that he became convinced that whoever possessed it, controlled the fate of the world. That the Wewelsburg was going to be the New Jerusalem and the centre of Germany is in evidence as from 1941 onwards, the architects called the complex the “Centre of the World”. In line with sacred mythology, the design would sit on a mountain, surrounded by a lake, as there were plans to flood the valley.

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VICTORIAN (circa 1850’s) LITTLE DEAN PRISON WARDEN /GUARD TUNIC BUTTONS NOW ON DISPLAY AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL

A RARE FIND AND A HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PART OF LITTLEDEAN JAILS HISTORY NOW HERE ON DISPLAY

EARLY VICTORIAN (CIRCA 1850’S) PRISON WARDEN/GUARD TUNIC BUTTONS AS WERE ATTACHED TO THE TUNIC AND WORN  HERE AT THE THEN CALLED ” LITTLE DEAN  PRISON ” AS CLEARLY INSCRIBED  HERE ON THE FRONT OF THE BUTTON …COMPLETE WITH  THE VICTORIAN CROWN EMBLEM , ON REVERSE STAMPED WITH THE BUTTON MAKERS NAME …. CHADWIN & SONS BIRMINGHAM .

 Probably insignificant to most visitors …. however I personally treasure these historic and rare original memorabilia items which have recently been, discovered, sourced  and acquired for permanent display here .

Intriguingly these early Victorian Prison Warden/Guard tunic buttons are clearly inscribed LITTLE  DEAN (AS TWO WORDS) WITH PRISON BENEATH (INSTEAD OF GAOL )  … as opposed to it’s early title as having been “Littledean Gaol”.

Littledean Gaol was built during the Georgian Period in 1791 at the same time and by the same architect as Northleach Prison and Horsley Prison . Horsley  Prison having long since been demolished .

Below : Original canvas type early Victorian straight jacket complete with leather straps , as was found in the attic of Littledean Jail during it’s renovation work back in 1986.

This was more than likely used during the Jail’s former use as a “House of Correction” as well as possibly during it’s time as a Victorian Jail ….. In any event a great historic piece here on display at the jail .

THE HISTORY OF LITTLEDEAN JAIL ..PAST AND PRESENT

Here is a brief pictorial history of Littledean Jail from Victorian times to present day …..

A VERY EARLY POSTCARD IMAGE OF LITTLEDEAN GAOL,  WHEN IT WAS USED AS A “HOUSE OF CORRECTION “.


About Littledean Jail – Alcatraz of the Forest…

Standing at the gateway to the Royal Forest of Dean, this former House of Correction – Littledean Jail was designed and built by the Pioneer of Prison Reform – Sir George Onesiphorous Paul and leading Prison Architect of his day – William Blackburn. As a result of the sudden death of Blackburn it was completed under the supervision of his new brother-in-law, architect William Hobson in 1791.

This remarkable Grade II* listed building was built as the most up-to-date, revolutionary House of Correction of its time, and was later seen as the Government’s role model for London’s Pentonville Prison and taken across the seas for the world famous Philadelphian Cherry Hill Penitentiary System in America. It was built for the miserly sum of £1,650. The building work was started in 1788 by Gabriel Rogers, who went bankrupt as a result of not being able to complete the work at such low costs. London Builder J. Fentiman was brought in to finish the job.

Behind the austere gatehouse entrance, the prison, with it’s formidable sandstone façade remains much as it was when first built. Steeped in history and infamy, its awesome appearance provides a stark reminder of the hard labour and craftsmanship needed to build this architecturally important jailhouse.

EARLY VICTORIAN PRISON WARDEN/GUARD TUNIC BUTTON

 Probably insignificant to visitors …. however I love this item which has been recently discovered and acquired for display here . Intriguingly this early Victorian Prison Warden/Guard tunic button is worded LITTLE DEAN (AS TWO WORDS) WITH PRISON BENEATH (INSTEAD OF GAOL )  … as opposed to it’s early title as having been “Littledean Gaol”.

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Littledean Jail – ‘The Crime Through Time Collection’

Previously set up and housed at a former police station and courthouse at Nicholson House, Newent in Gloucestershire between 1998 – 2003. It had soon outgrown its previous home and as a result of this has been relocated lock, stock and barrel to its much larger home, here at Littledean Jail.
Over the years its owner Andy Jones has become a (some say) controversial and distinguished county personality, with his much-publicised battles with Tewkesbury Borough and Forest of Dean Council planning officers. His ‘Crime Through Time Collection’ is of worldwide interest and is in itself a magnet for publicity… being regularly covered in newspapers, magazines and TV programmes around the globe.
Despite much publicised threats of enforcement, imprisonment and boycotting actions imposed upon the owner over some two decades or more… his collection has been highly acclaimed as being one of the most unorthodox, interesting and historically significant of its kind, providing a unique niche in the Tourism Market place.


Littledean Jail Admission Prices 2012:

Price includes admission to the Quadrophenia Collection.

  • Adults: £7.00
  • OAP’s: £5.95
  • Children (aged 8 – 16): £4.95
    Children under 8: FREE
  • Family: £21.00
  • If you’re 100 years young then admission is FREE!

How to AVOID Littledean Jail!

When you approach Littledean, the ‘Gateway to the Forest of Dean’,
follow the brown tourist signs.
Cars can be accommodated at the entrance to the jail whilst COACHES should simply use the Littledean village bus stops as ‘drop off points’. These are situated approximately 80 metres from the entrance to the jail on either side of the road.


Escape from Littledean Jail!

Gloucester is just 20 minutes from the Jail, but if you want to get further away, Bristol, Cheltenham, Hereford and Cardiff are about 40 minutes. Birmingham is a round hour, whilst London is only just under 3 hours away – but who would want to go there!


Opening times:

  • Open from April 1st to October 31st
  • Day visits are only allowed from 10am to 5pm (last entry 3.45pm)
  • Visiting Orders are not necessary!

Please kindly note that we are only OPEN from Thursdays to Sundays & Bank Holiday’s (or at other times solely at The Jailers discretion).

Occasionally special Corporate, Mystery Tours and Evening Visits for groups of 20 or more can be arranged, but only by kind permission from The Jailer (He’s only a little scary!)
Schools and College visits are also welcome, but must be under strict supervision, as
The Jailer has been known to lock trouble makers in the spare cells if compromised!

ABOVE ARE A FEW IMAGES OF LITTLEDEAN JAIL AS IT IS NOW, BOTH OUTSIDE AND IN.

CULT HORROR FILM ” HOUSE OF WHIPCORD ” FILMED ON LOCATION AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL BACK IN 1974

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FORMER HOUSE OF CORRECTION –  LITTLEDEAN JAIL USED FOR THE FILMING OF A TONGUE IN CHEEK , SOFT PORN LIKE  HAMMER HORROR FILM BACK IN 1974 (WHEN IT WAS STILL OWNED BY GLOUCESTERSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL)

 

 

House Of Whipcord is a bit of a surprise. You’ d think by the video packaging (and the name of the film) that you were in for some kind of kinky sub-Confessions movie featuring a bunch of nutters who get their kicks from dishing out spankings to naked young girls.

Welll… that is what you get (ahem). But it’s not the be-all and end-all.

House of Whipcord is auteur Pete Walker’s most famous film – and it’s not hard to see why. It’s not just a low budget tit-and-bum fest, it’s an intelligent, thoughtful movie, with just a few flashes of nudity, hardly any blood, and a distinct lack of floggings (there are just two – one takes place behind a door, and the other off camera).

It’s also a film which is hard to be funny about (what do you mean, that hasn’t stopped me so far? Cheeky bastards).

Of course, it has its minus points – most of the time the picture’s so dark you can’t see what the bloody hell’s going on – and some of the acting leaves something to be desired. When Ray “Mr Benn” Brookes is searching for his missing girlfriend, the people he asks for help look like they’ve been dragged off the street to act in the film. But other than that it’s a little gem – with more than a few things to say about capital punishment and society in general.

A truck driver (Mr Kind!) is stopped on a lonely, storm-swept road by a young, hardly-dressed girl (Penny Irving – usually seen adjusting her suspender belt in the background of sitcoms like Are You Being Served?) who’s in a bad way. After tutting about the state of the country etc, he tells her he’s going to take her to safety. Cue flashback.

The girl is Anne-Marie, a French model who spends her time wandering naked around the flat she shares with the equally undressed Anne Michelle (sister of Vicky, of Allo Allo fame). Anne-Marie has recently got ’em out for the press, too, but gets upset when a picture of her ladybumps appears on the wall at a party she’s attending.

Luckily, a handsome (in a 1974 kind of way) stranger called Mark E Desade (get it?) is on hand to whisk her away from all this – and despite sussing out that he’s a bit of an oddball, the lovely Anne-Marie agrees to go with him to meet his parents. Oh dear.

A slight hiccup in their relationship becomes apparent when it turns out that Mark’s parents live in an old prison, which they run as an extreme “correctional facility” for young girls.

On arrival Anne-Marie is stripped and shoved in a cell – then told that she’s got three chances – the first mistake she makes results in solitary confinement, the next gets her a flogging – and the third will be the last mistake she ever makes.

Of course, our feisty young heroine won’t stand for this and immediately starts making plans to escape… but although it’s relatively easy to hoodwink the guards, gimlet-eyed chief warder Mrs Walker is an entirely different kettle of (frozen) fish, and as for Mark’s mother, the spectacularly psychotic Mrs Wakehurst, there’s no way she’s letting anyone out of the place without a fight.

Director Pete Walker stages this parable with skill and panache – and even Anne Michelle isn’t too bad. Keep an eye out too for Victoria Wood’s best mate Celia Imrie somewhere in the background – and if you see her, award yourself a biscuit, cos no-one else has ever spotted her. Top marks go to 70s horror icon Sheila Keith, who plays Walker with relish. Add a scenery-chomping turn from Barbara Markham as Mrs Wakehurst, and a bit of pathos from her husband (Patrick Barr) as a blind judge who she is tricking into signing “death warrants” for the girls in her care, and the whole adds up to far more than you’d expect from what is, basically, a seedy bit of 70s exploitation.

Director: Pete Walker Writer(s): David McGillivray, Pete Walker (story)

Cast: Barbara Markham – Mrs. Wakehurst, Patrick Barr – Justice Bailey, Ray Brooks – Tony, Ann Michelle – Julia, Sheila Keith – Walker, Dorothy Gordon – Bates, Robert Tayman – Mark E. Desade, Ivor Salter – Jack, Karen David – Karen, Celia Quicke – Denise, Ron Smerczak – Ted, Tony Sympson – Henry, Judy Robinson – Claire, Jane Hayward – Estelle, Celia Imrie – Barbara, Barry Martin – Al, Rose Hill – Henry’s Wife, Dave Butler, Penny Irving – Ann-Marie Di Verney, David McGillivray – Caven, Denis Tinsley – Police Sergeant, Pete Walker – Cyclist