THE CONTROVERSIAL & ECCENTRIC WORLD OF THE NOW DECEASED ARTIST LUCIAN FREUD…SUE TILLEY “THE MODEL” …..AND THE KRAYS

How Lucian Freud once owed £500,000 in gambling debts to gangland Kray twins

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Lucian Freud
Birth name Lucian Michael Freud
Born 8 December 1922
BerlinGermany
Died 20 July 2011 (aged 88)
LondonEngland
Spouse Kathleen “Kitty” Epstein (1948–1952; divorced)
Lady Caroline Blackwood (1953–1959; divorced)
Nationality British
Field Painting
Training Central School of Art


East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing


Goldsmiths College

NAKED  SELF PORTRAIT OF LUCIAN FREUD

Private: Lucian Freud spoke candidly about his gambling problem

Artist Lucian Freud ran up half a million pounds in gambling debts with gangland crimelords the Kray brothers.

Britain’s most renowned living artist said the brothers ‘forced’ money on him to feed his addiction, but he was only able to repay them in small amounts.

The 87-year-old confessed he once cancelled an exhibition out of fear they would demand more money if they saw he was earning.

The situation got so bad that at one point he received a warning from the police.

In a revealing interview, the notoriously private artist discussed the nights he spent in police cells for fighting, his relationship with Kate Moss and how he escorted Greta Garbo to nightclubs.

‘She was the most famous person in the world at that stage. I was very young, she was in her late thirties,’ he said of the actress.

‘The people in the clubs could not believe it.’

He said of Kate Moss, whom he met through his fashion designer daughter Bella: ‘She was interesting company and full of surprising behaviour,’ said Freud, who in 2002  painted a portrait of the heavily-pregnant and naked model in 2002.

In an interview with the Evening Standard, he said he was sometimes annoyed when Miss Moss was late for sittings ‘only in that way that girls are’.

He believes the painting was unsuccessful because photographers waited outside his house, disturbing his obsession with privacy.

Freud had a well-documented relationship with the Kray twins Reggie and Ronnie – with Reggie counting Freud amongst his favourite painters.

Club owner: Reggie Kray, centre, with Eddie Pucci, Frank Sinatra's bodyguard and Shirley Bassey in the early SixtiesClub owner: Reggie Kray, centre, with Eddie Pucci, Frank Sinatra’s bodyguard and Shirley Bassey in the early Sixties

Their paths crossed in the swinging Sixties demi-monde of  West End nightclub life.

As club owners the Krays mixed with politicians and great entertainers of the day including Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland Shirley Bassey and Barbara Windsor.

The artist once said of his gambling: ‘I always went all out. The idea of it being a sport seemed to me insane. The thing I liked was risking everything. Losing everything to do with money.’

A self-portrait of Freud nursing a black eye after a punch-up with a taxi driver sold for more than £2.8million last monthA self-portrait of Freud nursing a black eye after a punch-up with a taxi driver sold for more than £2.8million last month

He also explained his reasons for stopping gambling: ‘As I got more money, they wouldn’t take the bets and it just became pointless.

‘If I’d been in very high-powered card games with grand, rich people, perhaps, but that wasn’t what I did.’

The artist also disclosed he has four new muses: he is painting his assistant David Dawson; artist and printmaker Perienne Christian, 26; and two restaurateurs – Jeremy King, co-owner of The Wolseley where Freud frequently eats, and Sally Clarke, owner of Clarke’s in Kensington.

Artist and gambler: Freud in 1958Artist and gambler: Freud in 1958

Freud is the grandson of Sigmund Freud and was born in Berlin where, at the age of nine, he photographed Hitler.

The family moved to England in 1933 to escape the rise of Nazism, and became British citizens six years later.

Freud reveals their naturalisation was made possible by the intervention of the Duke of Kent.

Freud’s painting Benefits Supervisor Sleeping, a life-size portrait of Jobcentre worker Sue Tilley, sold for £17.2million in 2008.

It set the world record for the highest price paid in an auction for a work of art by a living artist.

He remains ambitious though, adding: I work every day and night. I don’t do anything else. There is no point otherwise.’

This month, a self-portrait of Freud nursing a black eye after a punch-up with a taxi driver sold for more than £2.8million at auction.

The artist has previously discussed his habit of getting into scrapes, saying: ‘I used to have a lot of fights.

‘It wasn’t because I liked fighting, it was really just that people said things to me to which I felt the only reply was to hit them.

FLIPPING HELL !!! …NO THESE ARE NOT VINTAGE HAIRDRYERS OR POWER TOOLS..BELIEVE IT OR NOT…THESE ARE ORIGINAL & CERTAINLY WELL USED … “VICTORIAN VIBRATORS ” ETC

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HERE IS A BIT OF INTERACTIVE TITILLATING  …. “TONGUE IN CHEEK” INSIGHT  INTO SOME OF OUR  INTRIGUING AND THOUGHT PROVOKING TOOLS OF THE TRADE USED ON LADIES SUFFERING FROM HYSTERIA DURING THE VICTORIAN ERA THAT ARE ON DISPLAY AT THE JAIL … IN AND AMONGST OUR VERY CLUTTERED, DIVERSE CURIOSITIES AND OTHER COLLECTIONS

TORTURE (28)

 

Female hysteria was a once-common medical diagnosis, made exclusively in women, which is today no longer recognized by medical authorities as a medical disorder. Its diagnosis and treatment were routine for many hundreds of years in Western Europe. Hysteria was widely discussed in the medical literature of the 19th century. Women considered to be suffering from it exhibited a wide array of symptoms, including faintness, nervousness, sexual desire, insomnia, fluid retention, heaviness in the abdomen, muscle spasm, shortness of breath, irritability, loss of appetite for food or sex, and “a tendency to cause trouble”. In extreme cases, the woman would be forced into the asylum and undergo surgical hysterectomy.

 

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hysterical-paroxysm

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Are these power tools? Medieval torture devices? Ancient hairdryers? Vintage egg whisks? No, they are Victorian, er, personal massagers (including one you had to handcrank)

  • Late 19th, early 20th century self-vibrators on display in Gloucestershire
  • Were originally created by Victorian doctors to cure women of hysteria
  • Female patients were treated with ‘pelvic massage’ using plug-in vibrators
  • On display at Littledean Jail, former courthouse, in the Forest of Dean

Take a look at these pictures and consider for a moment what these rather brutal looking metal contraptions might be.

Are they power tools? Medieval torture devices? The world’s first hairdryers? Archaic egg whisks? Nope, these are actually Victorian vibrators, a collection of vintage self-massagers currently on display at Littledean Jail in the Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire, a former house of correction, police station and courthouse-turned-visitor attraction.

And exhibits include Dr Macaura’s Pulsocon Hand Crank Vibrator, which dates back to 1890 and resembles an old-fashioned egg whisk.

This may look like an early hair dryer with different attachments, but it is actually a vintage 'self-massager', used by women as a vibrator in the late 19th and early 20th centuries

This may look like an early hair dryer with different attachments, but it is actually a vintage ‘self-massager’, used by women as a vibrator in the late 19th and early 20th centuries

Dr. Macaura's Pulsocon Hand Crank (1890) Vibrator, which resembles an archaic egg whisk, is now on display at Littledean Jail, Forest of Dean,

Dr. Macaura’s Pulsocon Hand Crank (1890) Vibrator, which resembles an archaic egg whisk, is now on display at Littledean Jail, Forest of Dean,

According to Philip Larkin, sex began in 1963, between the end of the Lady Chatterley ban and the Beatles’ first LP.

But this collection of Victorian vibrators shows self-pleasuring has been going on for a whole lot longer than that.

Littledean Jail owner and curator Andy Jones, 51, described the assortment of sex toys as ‘a fascinating insight into women’s pleasure during Victorian times’.

The 'ACME' hand-held vibrator shows self-pleasuring has been going on for a whole lot longer than we originally believed

The ‘ACME’ hand-held vibrator shows self-pleasuring has been going on for a whole lot longer than we originally believed

When compared to today's vibrators such as the pink plastic rampant rabbit, the ACME is certainly a lot less... girly

When compared to today’s vibrators such as the pink plastic rampant rabbit, the ACME is certainly a lot less… girly

But despite its pleasurable connotations, the modern-style vibrator was actually invented by respectable Victorian doctors.

‘Pelvic massage’ was a common treatment for female hysteria during the Victorian era.

However, doctors found the process of administering the massage by hand tiring and time-consuming, and so devised a device to do the job for them.

Dr Joseph Mortimer Granville patented an electromechanical vibrator around 1880, a story told in the 2011 film Hysteria, featuring Maggie Gyllenhaal.

Despite its pleasurable connotations, the modern-style vibrator was actually invented by respectable Victorian doctors

Despite its pleasurable connotations, the modern-style vibrator was actually invented by respectable Victorian doctors

'If you plug them in, the force is incredible. They're loud and some of them look like hairdryers'

‘If you plug them in, the force is incredible. They’re loud and some of them look like hairdryers’

The vibrators come packed neatly in cases with a number of different attachments, and resembles an old-fashioned drill and its bits

The vibrators come packed neatly in cases with a number of different attachments, and resembles an old-fashioned drill and its bits

While some of these contraptions now look like they belong more in a torture chamber than beneath the sheets, they serve as testament to the ingenuity of Victorian inventors.

The sex toys also offer a fascinating insight into the supposedly ‘prim and proper’ Victorian world, in which some families would supposedly cover up table legs since they were seen as suggestive and risque.

‘If you plug them in, the force is incredible,’ Jones said. ‘They’re loud and some of them look like hairdryers.

‘I would imagine it would have been quite a painful exercise, judging by what I’ve seen of them, like having a kango hammer pressed against your body.’