THE AUSCHWITZ GOALKEEPER -RON JONES

AT THE GRAND OLD AGE OF 98…. BRITAIN’S OLDEST SURVIVING AUSCHWITZ NAZI DEATH CAMP  INMATE, NOW FEATURED HERE IN AND AMONGST THE NAZI HOLOCAUST YEARS EXHIBITION AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

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The Auschwitz goalkeeper: British prisoner of war who played in football match at Nazi death camp returns to bury the past

  • Ron Jones, 96, held in E715 – a prisoner of war camp alongside the main Auschwitz extermination camp in Poland
  • During the week prisoners of war were employed at forced labour camps but on Sunday allowed to play football
  • Games would take place on a field outside the camp with armed German guards watching
  • The Red Cross provided the teams with four sets of shirts – English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh
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An Auschwitz survivor who played in goal for the Welsh team in the Nazi death camp’s football league has returned to its site to bury the ghosts of his past.

Ron Jones, 96, was held in E715 – a prisoner of war camp alongside the main Auschwitz extermination camp in Poland – after being captured by German troops during World War II.

He said the soldiers were terrified.

‘We did not know what would happen to us. We thought at one time they would stick us in the gas chamber,’ said Ron.

‘It was not just Jews going in, it was Polish, political prisoners, gypsies, homosexuals.’

During the week prisoners were employed at forced labour camps, but on their rest day they were allowed to play football on a field just outside the camp – with armed German guards watching from the sidelines.

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Father-of-one Ron said: “We didn’t work on a Sunday so we used to play football.’

The Red Cross heard about it and brought the teams four sets of shirts – English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh.

Ron, a widower, of Newport, South Wales, played in goal for the Welsh team at the camp, which is situated near the Polish town of Oswiecim.

‘When you’re under those conditions it was a real pleasure to play football on a Sunday,’ he said.

‘But we could only play in the summer, of course, because in the winter it was deep with snow.’

Ron Jones

Prisoner of war Ron Jones (centre, back row) – the goalkeeper for the Welsh team in the Auschwitz football league.

Football was a brief respite from the prisoners’ suffering as throughout the games smoke would rise ominously from the chimneys of Auschwitz.

“The first thing you’d notice was the smell,’ said Ron. ‘If the wind was in your direction the smell was terrible.’

‘We were always frightened we would be next.’

He left the camp near the end of 1945 as part of the Auschwitz death march – when the Nazis forcibly moved prisoners as the Soviet army came to liberate.

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Former Nazi death camp Auschwitz in Oswiecim, Poland, where Ron played in goal for the Welsh team during World War II.

For more than four months he was marched 900 miles across Europe before eventually being freed by American troops.

He lost half his body weight and had to watch more than a hundred of his allied comrades die in the freezing conditions.

But he survived the ordeal and eventually returned to his home to be reunited with his wife Gwladys.

Ron is now only one of three men still alive who survived the death march.

He has returned to Auschwitz as a book about his survival called The Auschwitz Goalkeeper is published later this month.

Ron said returning to the death camp stirred up strong memories.

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Auschwitz 1945

Auschwitz-Birkenau in 2005, and in 1945, where Ron was held after being captured by German troops.

‘There was the humiliation and the lack of food but on the whole life wasn’t too bad.’

‘The Germans, contrary to what a lot of people think, were pretty good to us on the whole.’

But it was the march that was terrible.

‘I could still see it when I first went back to Auschwitz, I couldn’t sleep with the memories.’

About 1.5 million people, primarily Jews, were killed at the Auschwitz  complex between 1940 and 1945. Two years after the end of World War II it became a museum.

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ORIGINAL 100 GRAM SIZED…. ZYKLON B CANISTERS FROM THE NAZI HOLOCAUST ERA USED AT GRAFENECK EUTHANASIA CENTRE HOUSED AT GRAFENECK CASTLE , GERMANY NOW ON DISPLAY AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

POLITE WARNING …  THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL (WHERE UPON THIS EXHIBITION IS HOUSED )  IS NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN OR THOSE OF YOU WHO ARE EASILY OFFENDED , DISTURBED OR OF A SENSITIVE NATURE

THE CONTENT HERE ON DISPLAY BOTH ONLINE AND WITHIN THE JAIL IS IN THE MAIN HARD HITTING , GRAPHIC, EXPLICIT , IN YOUR FACE , TONGUE IN CHEEK , CONTROVERSIAL AND TO MANY … VERY DISTURBING

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 Used original Zyklon B 100gram sized canisters from one of the first Nazi gas chambers situated at Grafeneck Euthanasia Center, housed in Grafeneck Castle, Germany . It had officially opened in January 1940 and was closed on the orders of Nazi warlord Himmler in December 1940 . This facility was mainly used to exterminate mentally Handicapped and retarded victims as part of the Nazi euthanasia program. These canisters are exceptionally rare find from what was one of the earliest gas chambers and crematorium facilities . There is evidence that exists to the effect that a minimum 10, 654 were gassed there, though inevitably many more victims were murdered there before its closure . these canisters are now on public display at the Crime Through Time Collection, Littledean Jail

Grafeneck Gas chamber

GRAFENECK GAS CHAMBER AT GRAFENECK CASTLE

Grafeneck Castle

The former medieval castle Grafeneck was built on a hill near Marbach.
On 24 May 1939, members of Aktion T4 visited the buildings in order to find out if it could be used for their killing programme. On 14 OctoberGrafeneck Castle was duly confiscated. Between 10 and 15 manual labourers from nearby villages started to convert the castle into a killing centre.

300 m away from the castle several barracks were built, fenced in with a hoarding up to 4 m high. On the first floor of the castle the following facilities were installed: accomodations and offices for the doctors, a registry office, a police office, the office for the comfort letters and others. On the second floor, small living- and sleeping rooms for the personnel were installed. The main building of the killing facility was a barrack (68 m long and 7 m wide), which included several rooms. In one of them 100 beds were placed, covered with straw-bags. Three big buses for transportation of the victims and an ambulance car stood in a wooden garage. Two mobile cremation ovens were located in another wooden barrack. Because of the immense heat, generated by the round-the-clock cremation, the roof of the barrack was removed and after a short time the surrounding trees even blackened. The gas chamber, resembling a shower bath, could hold 75 persons.
A former horse stable (round, and 15 m in diameter) probably served as storage room for the corpses. At the bottom of the hill, at the access road, a high hoarding and a guardhouse were built. Fences with barbed wire surrounded the whole castle whilst armed guards with dogs patrolled these perimeters.

Grafeneck Map.
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In mid-November 1939, SS men, typists and other personnel arrived and were supplemented during early January 1940 by approximately 25 nurses, some being male. In mid-January the cremation ovens were delivered. On 18 January 1940 the first transport of 25 handicapped men arrived fromEglfing-Haar near Munich, managed by the Grafeneck chief Dr Horst Schumann. He joined T4 since early October 1939, after a meeting with Viktor Brack in Hitler‘s chancellery. In early summer of 1940 he was ordered to the Sonnenstein euthanasia centre. Successors in Grafeneck: Dr Ernst Baumhardt and finally Dr Günther Hennecke.
Chief of administration became Christian Wirth, a detective superintendent and SS-Obersturmführer. He supervised the first gassings. Later he became inspector of all Aktion Reinhard extermination camps.

The killing continued until 13 December 1940. Then Grafeneck was no longer part of the euthanasia programme because, according to the plan, all handicapped persons from the Grafeneck operational area had been killed. Some of the personnel went on holiday while some were ordered to theHadamar euthanasia centre. A few remained at the castle to cover up all tracks of the actions that happened there.
10,824 victims were gassed and cremated at this facility.

zyklon B

WHAT IS ZYKLON B?

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Zyklon B (German pronunciation: [tsykloːn ˈbeː]; also spelled Cyclon B or Cyclone B) was the trade name of a cyanide-based pesticideinvented in the early 1920s, and manufactured by German chemical conglomerate IG Farben. Zyklon B consisted of hydrogen cyanide(prussic acid), a stabilizer, a warning odorant (ethyl bromoacetate), and one of several adsorbents. Zyklon A was a previously produced liquid pesticide, which released hydrogen cyanide in a chemical reaction with water. After the invention of Zyklon B, Zyklon A production ceased.

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The product is infamous for its use by Nazi Germany to murder an estimated 1.2 million people, including approximately 960,000 Jews, ingas chambers installed in several extermination camps during the Holocaust. One of the co-inventors of Zyklon B, chemist and businessman Bruno Tesch, was executed by the British in 1946 for his role in this operation.

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The containers above hold Zyklon-B pellets (hydrocyanic acid) that vaporize when exposed to air. Originally intended for commercial use as a disinfectant and an insecticide, the Nazis discovered through experimentation the gas could be used to kill humans.

The brand of Zyklon-B used by the Nazis contained substances which gave the pellets a blue appearance and left blue stains inside gas chambers which can still be seen today in chambers that were left intact.

During the killing process, prisoners at Auschwitz and other killing centers were forced into the air-tight chambers that had been disguised by the Nazis to look like shower rooms. The Zyklon pellets were then dumped into the chambers via special air shafts or openings in the ceiling.

The pellets would then vaporize, giving off a noticeable bitter almond odor. Upon being breathed in, the vapors combined with red blood cells, depriving the human body of vital oxygen, causing unconsciousness, and then death through oxygen starvation.

JOSEF MENGELE – THE ANGEL OF DEATH

NAZI HOLOCAUST YEARS EXHIBITION AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL (LEST WE FORGET)

Here is more interactive and hopefully educational, historical background footage and insight into the horrors of the Nazi holocaust years.  

Josef Rudolf Mengele was a German SS officer and a physician in the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz. He earned doctorates in anthropology from Munich University and in medicine from Frankfurt University

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Josef Rudolf Mengele (German: [ˈjoːzɛf ˈʁuːdɔlf ˈmɛŋələ] ( listen); 16 March 1911 – 7 February 1979) was a German SS officer and a physician in the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz. He earned doctorates in anthropology from Munich University and in medicine from Frankfurt University. He initially gained notoriety for being one of the SS physicians who supervised the selection of arriving transports of prisoners, determining who was to be killed and who was to become a forced laborer, but is far more infamous for performing human experiments on camp inmates, including children, for which Mengele was called the “Angel of Death”.

In 1940, he was placed in the reserve medical corps, after which he served with the 5th SS Panzergrenadier Division Wiking in the Eastern Front. In 1942, he was wounded at the Soviet front and was pronounced medically unfit for combat. He was then promoted to the rank ofSS-Hauptsturmführer (Captain) for saving the lives of three German soldiers. He survived the war and, after a period of living incognito in Germany, he fled to South America, where he evaded capture for the rest of his life, despite being hunted as a Nazi war criminal.

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