LONDON UNDERWORLD GANGLAND BOSS – CHARLIE RICHARDSON ( 1934 – 2012)

Charlie Richardson: Shrewd and ruthless leading figure of London’s 1960s criminal scene

BELOW IS PICTURE OF ANDY JONES FROM THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION WITH LONDON UNDERWORLD CRIME BOSS AND LONG STANDING ACQUAINTANCE  – CHARLIE RICHARDSON AT ONE OF THE PAST EVENTS TOGETHER

CHARLIE HAD KINDLY INTRODUCED ANDY TO A NUMBER OF FELLOW ASSOCIATES WHO IN TURN HAVE PERSONALLY CONTRIBUTED VARIOUS ITEMS TO THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION NOW ON DISPLAY AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL

Charlie Richardson was among the shrewdest of the serious crime figures who populated London’s post war underworld. “He was a genius, not like a professor who might know about art and paintings, but as a money maker,” Frank Fraser said of him.

He was born in Camberwell, south-east London in 1934; his brother Eddie was born in 1936, the youngest sibling Alan in 1940. Charlie and Eddie were brought up in a traditional south London working-class family, and like their east London counterparts, the Kray twins, they endured a wartime childhood, enjoyed the vibrant street life of working-class London and developed as talented young boxers and prominent street fighters.

According to folklore, the Richardsons were the south London nemesis of the Krays. However, unlike the twins, Charlie and Eddie had a penchant for hard work, and made good money from the post-war scrap metal trade, plundering the remnants of abandoned wartime airfields.

With a merchant seaman father who was often missing from home, the teenage Charlie exhibited an entrepreneurial zeal. He moved into a number of areas, including wholesale chemists and mineral mining, as well as extortion and, notably, long firm fraud. This involved an apparently legitimate wholesaling business being set up, initially paying for goods on time. When their credit limit was reached, they sold up and disappeared.

Richardson surrounded himself with long firm specialists, men described to me by Eddie Richardson as “plausible rogues”, and a number were sent to Milan to place orders with manufacturers for stockings on behalf of a company called Central Supplies. On arrival in London the stockings were sold by mail order, but with money and goods leaking from the business, and with the Italians pressing, Central Supplies burnt down. Richardson then set up a new company, LR Gray, based in Mitre St in the City. A number of Richardson associates were beaten for stealing from the long firms, before LR Grey also “had a fire”.

Charlie Richardson had first encountered the Kray twins in Shepton Mallet military prison, where all were awaiting a dishonorable discharge from National Service. The honeypot of the West End brought them back into contact, and though the east London firm claimed to be preparing for warfare, there is little to suggest the Richardson firm took them seriously. The Richardsons could boast among their associates some of London’s most feared men, including one of the “Chainsaw Robbers” Jimmy Moody, as well as George Cornell, an East Ender who had clashed with the youthful Krays, and Frank Fraser, whose affiliation to the Richardsons was described by Mickey Bloom, an associate of the Nash Brothers, as “like China getting the atom bomb.”

Fraser summed up the firm’s attitude to the Krays: “Using racing terms, there would be no race… The Richardsons were miles in front, brain power, everything.” In their dotage Charlie and Eddie expressed contempt for the Kray firm, and although skirmishes and casualties were not unknown while the Krays, in particular Ronnie, fantasised over Chicago-style gang wars, the Richardons diversified into long firms, gaming machines, pornography, scrap metal yards, a perlite mine in South Africa, control over car parking at Heathrow, and more.

Charlie had become increasingly fascinated by South Africa, in particular the opportunities in the country’s mineral industry. He became embroiled with the South African security services, who dangled the carrot of mining licences in front of him in exchange for Charlie arranging to have the telephones tapped of Amnesty International and Harold Wilson.

In 1966, in a shooting at Mr Smiths Club in Catford, an associate of the Krays was killed and five men were wounded. Eddie Richardson and Frank Fraser were arrested, Fraser for murder. The following night Ronnie Kray murdered George Cornell.

Richardson’s penchant for attacking fellow fraudsters who he suspected of stealing from his long firms resulted in the infamous “torture trial” in 1967, which featured allegations of the use of pliers to remove teeth and fingernails, and the attachment of electrodes to genitals. Alleged victims of the Richardsons were granted immunity from prosecution if they “turned Queen’s Evidence”, and a distinct lack of physical evidence did not deter the judge, Mr Justice Lawton. Eddie was sentenced to 10 years with another five for the Mr Smith incident, and Frank Fraser received five years for affray and 10 years for some deviant dental practices at the Richardsons’ Peckham scrapyard. Charlie received 25 years: “I was charged with a bit of long firm fraud and five counts of grievous bodily harm. Nobody was dead, maimed or even bloody scarred.”

The sentencing policy was undoubtably savage, and whether this was due to a fear of American-style “organised crime” or was linked to Richardson’s relationship with the South African Secret Service remains, over 40 years later, difficult to unpack. Files have been sunk deep into the long grass of British officialdom. Charlie Richardson was arrested on 30 July 1966; in 1980 he escaped from an open prison and remained free for just under a year. In 1984 he was finally released.

Charlie Richardson was the epitome of the tough working class self-made man who cut corners, and while violence was at the core of his success, his relationship with corrupt police officers was probably more significant. He did not play at being a gangster, and in his prime he was the real deal, shrewd and manipulative and quick to dole out violence to fellow underworld residents. But he was also well-read, articulate, extremely funny, and addicted to business. One of his last ventures was a scheme to take some control over the “true crime” genre, and to the end he loved doing deals, with film-makers, writers and a range of disparate individuals. However, along with his wife Veronica and his familyy, mining was his passion.

Nobody could swear quite like Charlie Richardson, and he reserved his most heartfelt oaths for the ex-business associates and members of the Establishment who, he insisted to his death (of complications from peritonitis), had conspired to deprive him of his liberty for 18 years.

NOTORIOUS LONDON GANGLAND FIGUREHEAD – “MAD” FRANKIE FRASER

 TRUE CRIME, GANGLAND,MAFIA, MURDERABILIA AND BEYOND…. IT’S ALL HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL 

HERE’S AN INTERACTIVE INSIGHT INTO THE MAD AND VIOLENT WORLD OF MAD FRANKIE FRASER

HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION WE FEATURE AND INCLUDE A GREAT MANY GANGLAND FIGURES INCLUDING “MAD” FRANKIE FRASER AS PART OF OUR TRUE CRIME AND GANGLAND  COLLECTIONS.

ALSO BELOW ARE SOME MORE INTERACTIVE BACKGROUND VIDEO FOOTAGE RELATING TO THE LIFE AND TIMES OF THIS NOTORIOUS CRIMINAL AND FORMER MEMBER OF THE RICHARDSON GANG WHO RULED THE LONDON GANGLAND SCENE IN THE 1960’S ALONG WITH THEIR RIVALS – THE KRAY TWINS .

 ABOVE IS ONE OF THE MANY PERSONALLY SIGNED GANGLAND MEMORABILIA ITEMS ON DISPLAY AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION HERE AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL .

Early life

Born in Lambeth, south London, Fraser was a deserter during World War II, on several occasions escaping from his barracks. It was during the war that Fraser first became involved in serious crime, with the blackout and rationing, combined with the lack of professional policemen due to conscription, providing ample opportunities for criminal activities. In 1941, he was sent to Borstal for breaking into a Waterloo hosiery store and was then given a 15-month prison sentence at Wandsworth Prison for shopbreaking. Such were the criminal opportunities during the war, Fraser later joked in a television interview that he had never forgiven the Germans for surrendering.

Fraser confirms in his book ‘Mad Frank & Friends’ that his grandmother was a Canadian Red Indian.[4]

[edit]Post-war

After the war, Fraser was involved in a smash-and-grab raid on a jeweller’s for which he received a two-year prison sentence, served largely at Pentonville Prison. It was during this sentence that he was first certified insane and was sent to the Cane Hill Hospital, London, before being released in 1949. During the 1950s his main occupation was as bodyguard to well-known gangster Billy Hill. He took part in more bank robberies and spent more time in prison. He was again certified insane while at Durham Prison and this time sent to Broadmoor. Aware of the punishments for bad behaviour in that institution, Fraser stayed out of trouble and was released in 1955. In 1956, the British mobster Jack Spot and wife Rita were attacked, on Hill’s say-so, by Fraser, Bobby Warren and at least half a dozen other men. Both Fraser and Warren were given seven years for their acts of violence.[5]

[edit]The Richardson Gang

It was in the early 1960s that he first met Charlie and Eddie Richardson, members of the notorious Richardson Gang and rivals to the Kray twins.[6] One member of the criminal fraternity was quoted as saying that “Mad Frank joining the Richardson’s Gang was like China getting the atom bomb”.[citation needed] According to Fraser, it was they who helped him avoid arrest for the Great Train Robbery by bribing a policeman. Together they set up the Atlantic Machines fruit machines enterprise, which acted as a front for the criminal activities of the gang.[7] In 1966 Fraser was charged with the murder of Richard Hart who was shot at Mr Smiths’s club in Catford while other members including Jimmy Moody were charged with affray. The witness changed his testimonyand the charges were eventually dropped, though he still received a five year sentence for affray. Fraser has always maintained that, while he fought with Hart, he did not shoot him. He was also implicated in the so-called ‘Torture trial’, in which members of the gang were charged with burning, electrocuting and whipping those found guilty of disloyalty by a kangaroo court. Fraser himself was accused of pulling out the teeth of victims with a pair of pliers. In the trial at the Old Bailey in 1967 he was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment.[8]

[edit]Violence

Fraser’s 42 years served in over 20 different prisons in the UK were often coloured by violence.[9] He was involved in riots and frequently fought with prison officers and fellow inmates as well as attacking various governors. He was one of the ringleaders of the major Parkhurst Prison riot in 1969, spending the following six weeks in the prison hospital, owing to his injuries. Involvement in such activities often led to his sentences being extended. Whilst in Strangeways, Manchester in 1980 Fraser was ‘excused boots’ as he claimed he had problems with his feet so he was allowed to wear slippers. He was released from prison in 1985, where he was met by his son in a Rolls Royce.[10]

In 1991 Fraser was shot in the head from close range in an apparent murder attempt outside the Turnmills Club in Clerkenwell, London. He has always maintained that a policeman was responsible.

[edit]Later life

Fraser has become something of a celebrity, appearing on television shows such as Operation Good Guys,[11] Shooting Stars,[12] and the satirical show Brass Eye,[13] where he said Noel Edmonds should be shot for killing Clive Anderson (an incident invented by the show’s producers), and writing an autobiography. In 1999 he appeared at the Jermyn Street Theatre in London in a one man show, ‘An Evening with Mad Frankie Fraser’ (directed by Patrick Newley), which subsequently toured the UK.

He also appeared as East End crime boss Pops Den in the feature film Hard Men, a forerunner of British gangster movies such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and had a documentary made of his life Mad Frank which was released as part of the DVD The Ultimate Gangster DVD (2003 Gangster Videos), which featured crime figures Charles BronsonJohn McVicar, Paddy Joe Hill, Albert Reading, Dave CourtneyRoy ShawNorman Parker, Marilyn Wisbey and axe victim Eric Mason. This programme was also shown on The Crime & Investigation Channel & Biography Channel in the UK and was directed by Liam Galvin.

He now gives gangland tours around London, where he highlights infamous criminal locations such as the Blind Beggar pub. He lives in the Walworth area of London.

Fraser is also a big Arsenal fan, and his grandson Tommy Fraser is a professional footballer,[14] and formerly captain of League Two side Port Vale. According to legend, when he was at Brighton, Tommy was asked by a local reporter if his grandfather ever came to watch him play. “No,” came the reply. “But he reads your reports and he was unhappy you only gave me six out of 10 last week.” Tommy never got less than seven again.[citation needed] Another of Fraser’s grandsons, James Fraser, also spent a short time with Bristol Rovers. Another grandson, Anthony Fraser, was being sought by police in February 2011 for his alleged involvement in alleged £5million cannabis smuggling ring.[15]

[edit]Books

  • Fraser, Frank & Morton, James (2000). Mad Frank’s Diary: A Chronicle of the Life of Britain’s Most Notorious Villain. Virgin Books. ISBN 1-85227-874-9.
  • Fraser, Frank & Morton, James (1995). Mad Frank: Memoirs of a Life of Crime. Time Warner Paperbacks. ISBN 0-7515-1137-4.

[edit]Film

London-based production company Classic Media Entertainment has secured the film rights to Mad Frankie’s life. A feature film production is currently in development and the production has Fraser’s endorsement[16].

[edit]External links

[edit]References

TOBY VON JUDGE ” TOTIE CONSIGLIERE ”

TOBY VON JUDGE

A real-life Mafia consigliere is generally the number three person in a crime family, after the boss and underboss in most cases A crime family normally has only one consigliere at a time, but bosses have on occasion appointed more than one. The boss, underboss, and consigliere constitute a three-man ruling panel, or “Administration.”

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Above from left to right … Jules (admin at Littledean Jail), Toby Von Judge (Consigliere Totie ) and Andy Jones of the Crime Through Time Collection at Littledean Jail .

Above are a couple of recent photographs  (16th July 2013 ) taken during a night out in London , UK …. having an Indian curry and a few drinks .

Toby Von Judge pictured here above with His Holiness .. Pope John Paul II at a private meeting at the Vatican in Rome

When a boss gives orders, he issues them in private either to the consigliere or directly to his caporegimes as part of the insulation between himself and operational acts.

Below is a short rare pictorial gallery featuring various old and present day images of Toby Von Judge – Consigliere ….a  long time close personal friend to Andy Jones of the Crime Through Time Collection at Littledean Jail ….The images include Toby pictured with the likes of the Pontiff John Paul , Roy Shaw, A.J, pics from the Reg Kray funeral and the scarf Pavarotti gave to him at a concert .

WHILST YOU WILL NEVER BE ABLE TO FIND ANY PUBLICLY AVAILABLE INFORMATION ON TOBY VON JUDGE ON ANY INTERNET  BASED SOCIAL NETWORKS ….. REST ASSURED HE IS HELD IN THE HIGHEST ESTEEM  IN THE HIGH COUNSEL OF THE INTERNATIONAL  CRIMINAL UNDERWORLDS .

The Last Consigliere: Synopsis.

Consigliere: my life’s journey to become the leading technical legal advisor to the world’s leading Mafia heads.  I chart out my evolving personal friendships with family heads past and present: The Capa. Toto de-capo Giuseppe Furlucie. Mario Juliano, Giorgio Gardini, The Pontiff John Paul the Second, Fidel and his brother Ronaldo Castro, and Pablo de Sanchez, John Gotti, Georgie Gambine, Sir Gaylord Plisencie, and Roman Abramovich.  My friendships have given me a unique and unparalleled insight into the closed door workings the Mafia.

My life changing decision to decline my silks at the feet of Lord Chancellor Hailsham at my turning out ceremony at Downing College of Cambridge owing to the fatal flaws inherent inUKcriminal law started my journey to become the trusted consul and advisor to the world’s notorious mafia fraternities.  The journey started out in the Patio Club inWimbledonin the mid 1960’s with coincidentally meeting South London Captain Joey Pyle and Charlie Kray.  Friendships with Ronnie and Reggie Kray followed, continued by Roy Shaw, the Lambrianou’s and Freddy Foreman.  From these beginnings my contacts grew beyond the confines of the UK’s shores.

My psychology of mistrust of authority and the “the system” grew and was bred from the harm I suffered of sexual molestation and mental abuse at the hands of the Social Services system after being abandoned on the steps of Queen Mary’s Hospital in Roehampton as a baby in arms.  My faith in human nature was returned to me by my eventual salvation in the form of His Honour Sir James Richter and wife Deborah, whom became my adopted father and doting mother at the age of 16.  My mother was a close friend to Bobo nanny to their Royal Highnesses Lilibeth and Margret Rose.  This gave me access and unique insight into the behind the scenes relationships and workings of the royal circle.

My story contains the closed door and symbiotic workings of the Mafia and Governments throughout the world.  Domestically this symbiosis can be seen within the command structures shared between MI6, 5 and O29K Special Branch: one could colloquially, but not incorrectly, call these forces the “hit men of the government”.

Authenticating documentation and photographic evidence is available.

Toby Von Judge M.B.E. G.C.K.T. F.R.C.M. A.C.M.

UPDATE ……… BONNIE , R.I.P

The Consigliere has lost his best friend,his darling Bonnie a little dog who was the side of his hand, they had been together for 20 years, she was his rock,and will be so much missed by all who new her. his words were, ill always love you Bonnie,then when I die we will be to together. TOBY VON JUDGE  CONSIGLIERE TOTIE,  G.K.K.T   .M.B.E. K.B.E.

bonnie

What is a Consigliere ?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Consigliere (Italian consigliere “counselor”, pronounced [konsiʎˈʎɛːre]) is a position within the leadership structure of Sicilian and American Mafia crime families. The word was popularized by Mario Puzo‘s novel The Godfather (1969), and its film adaptation. In the novel, a consigliere is an adviser or counselor to the boss, with the additional responsibility of representing the boss in important meetings both within the boss’s crime family and with other crime families. The consigliere is a close, trusted friend and confidant, the mob’s version of an elder statesman. He is devoid of ambition and dispenses disinterested advice. This passive image of the consigliere does not correspond with what little is known of real-life consiglieri.[1]

A real-life Mafia consigliere is generally the number three person in a crime family, after the boss and underboss in most cases.[2] A crime family normally has only one consigliere at a time, but bosses have on occasion appointed more than one. The boss, underboss, and consigliere constitute a three-man ruling panel, or “Administration.”[3]

When a boss gives orders, he issues them in private either to the consigliere or directly to his caporegimes as part of the insulation between himself and operational acts.

In Italian, consigliere means “adviser” or “counselor.” It is derived from Latin consiliarius (advisor) and consilium (advice). The terminology of the U.S. Mafia is taken from that of the Sicilian Mafia and suggests that an analogy is intended to imitate the court of a medieval Italian principality. For example, Venice was led by a doge (duke) and a consigliere ducale (advisor doge). An underboss will normally move up to boss when the position becomes vacant, so his position is equivalent to that of heir to the throne. Consigliere, meanwhile, is analogous to chief minister or chancellor. (Oddly, in the novel The Godfather, the word is spelled consigliori; in the films, it is clearly pronounced consigliere.) In Joe Bonanno‘s book A Man Of Honor he explains that a consigliere is more of the voice or rep for the soldiers of the family, and may help solve and mediate disputes for the lower echelon of the family.[edit]Etymology

Structure of Mafia crime family

[edit]Examples from U.S. mob

Joe Valachi mentions a mysterious “Sandino” arbitrating disputes as the Genovese family consigliere in the 1940s.[4] But in more recent times, consiglieri have tended to take a more active role in family affairs. In 1971, Colombo family Consigliere Joseph Yacovelli directed a murder campaign against renegade Colombo family soldier Joseph “Crazy Joe” Gallo.[1] Two decades later, another Colombo consigliere, Carmine Sessa, led a hit team that attempted to assassinate the acting boss, Victor Orena.[1] In 1976, Frank Bompensiero was appointed consigliere of the Los Angeles crime family, only to be murdered in a public phone booth in February 1977.[1] Bompensiero’s boss promoted him so that it would cause him to let his guard down.[1] Electronic surveillance in 1979 recorded New England Mafia Boss Raymond Patriarca Jr. talking about appointing his consigliere, so the position need not be chosen as a result of a consensus-seeking process.[1] When New Jersey ConsigliereStefano “Steve the Truck Driver” Vitabile found out in 1992 that his family’s underboss, John “Johnny Boy” D’Amato, was bisexual, he ordered him killed.[5] In 1993, Paul Gulino, a drug dealer and associate of the Bonanno crime family, was murdered after he allegedly “put hands” on his family’s consigliere.[6]

James Ida, the current Genovese consigliere, has been serving a life sentence since 1996. Dominick Cirillo is the family’s acting consigliere. Joseph Corozzo is the current Gambino consigliere, whileAnthony Rabito is consigliere for the Bonanno crime family. As these examples illustrate, consiglieri nowadays are generally former soldiers and capos, not outside advisers.

[edit]In popular culture

In the movies The Godfather and The Godfather Part II, the consigliere to Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando), and later Don Michael Corleone (Al Pacino), is Tom Hagen (played by Robert Duvall). (In the novel, Tom’s predecessor, Genco Abbandando, is briefly featured, dying in a hospital room on the day of Connie’s wedding. This scene was filmed for the first movie, and has been included in some television showings.) Hagen is the adopted son of Don Vito Corleone, and doubles as the family’s lawyer. At the end of The Godfather, Don Vito’s successor and son, Michael, temporarily demotes Hagen within the organization, saying that things could get rough during the family’s move to Las Vegas, and he needs a “wartime consigliere.” (In an earlier scene, Sonny Corleone, Michael’s older brother and acting Don after Vito Corleone’s attempted assassination, similarly criticizes Hagen.) Vito Corleone, Michael’s father, replaces Hagen at Michael’s side as de facto consigliere until his death. Tom is reinstated after Vito’s death.

In the television series The SopranosSilvio Dante is the consigliere to Tony Soprano.

In The Simpsons episode “Donnie Fatso” Homer explains to an FBI agent that he was at one time Fat Tony’s consigliere, (see “The Mook, the Chef, the Wife and Her Homer“) but has trouble pronouncing the word and just says “his Robert Duvall”; a reference to Duvall’s character in The Godfather Series.