THE REAL JAMES BOND 007 … CAPTAIN PETER MASON (Winston Churchhill’s post-war secret SAS Baker Team)

THE REAL JAMES BOND “007” – CAPTAIN PETER MASON 

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HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL, FOREST OF DEAN, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, UK …….. WE TOUCH UPON THE MANY INEXTRICABLE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE REAL JAMES BOND 007 , THE UK SPECIAL FORCES AND THE SOE ( SPECIAL OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE ) AMONGST OTHERS

YOU WILL HOPEFULLY ENJOY OUR COLLECTIONS AND DISPLAYS WHICH INCLUDES SIGNED PHOTOGRAPHS OF A GREAT MANY JAMES BOND 007 MOVIE STARS , THE BOND GIRLS , ACTION MAN FIGURES ETC ETC , WHICH ARE ALL ON DISPLAY TOO IN AMONGST ALL THE HISTORICAL EXHIBITS AND EDUCATIONAL INSIGHTS INTO THE UK’S SPECIAL FORCES . 

POLITE WARNING 

PLEASE DO BE AWARE THAT THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GRAPHIC AND EXPLICIT ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBITS AND FEATURES TOO IN AMONGST THESE DISPLAYS 

51SDEN9CH9L._SY300_Captain Peter Mason is a former member of the post-war SAS Baker Team who were issued a licence to kill by the British government.

Mason was involved in the mission to seek out and ‘remove’ Nazi Special Forces who had followed out orders to execute captured British forces during the Second World War.[1]

His experiences and knowledge of the spy world was influential in the creation of the fictitious spy James Bond. Creator Ian Fleming was a friend of Mason and would consult him on the gadgets and methods used during the period. Gadgets used by Mason are part of a display at the Combined Military Services Museum in Maldon, Essex. The items on show were all used by spies of all sides during the Cold War period of the 1950s and ’60s.

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This excellent documentary  footage posted below does advance the realization that what Royal Navy Commander Ian Fleming wrote about in his James Bond, secret agent 007 novels was indeed, REAL.

However, to do this, it advances the false premise that Fleming had to look at other men for his inspiration when the truth is that HE WAS A SPY, A COMMANDO as well as an intelligence operative. Fleming worked for MI6 BEFORE WW2 when working for Reuters (owned by MI6) and after WW2 as head of Kelmsley Newspaper’s Foreign Department under the cover as a journalist. During WW2, Fleming went on several missions as either a spy or as a Commando while the 2IC of Naval Intelligence. He participated in the Royal Navy Reserves until at least 1951. Who does that sound like?

James Bond.

Ian Fleming was James Bond.

James Bond is REAL.

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as reported in the Sunday Times

The Sunday Times, London, Dec. 28, 1997

British Hit Squad ‘executed’ Nazis

by Nicholas Hellen, Media Correspondent

BRITISH SOLDIERS WERE secretly assigned to hunt and kill Nazi criminals after the second world war, according to a member of a special unit who claims he personally executed 16 Germans.

Peter Mason, 73, has described how he was recruited in May 1945 to avenge the deaths of Special Operations Executive (SOE) spies murdered in concentration camps and SAS men shot by the SS as saboteurs. The mission was intended to punish war criminals not prominent enough to face justice at Nuremberg and other trials conducted by the allies at the end of the war.

In the euphoria after VE day, the British Government was reluctant to rake over some of the war’s goriest episodes publicly. Disclosure of the Hunter-killer units would have undermined the legitimacy ensured by the war trials. The capture of German military records in Strasbourg, however made secret revenge possible on men who might otherwise have vanished. Mason, who led the unit killing Nazis until 1948, initially mounted his covert sorties from a converted stable block in the Black Forest village of Wildbad near Stuttgart, under Major Eric Barkworth, of 2 SAS, who sent him regular instructions by dispatch rider.

Independent historical research has already shown that Barkworth oversaw a separate less sensitive mission to arrest German war criminals from a base at Gaggenau, near Wildbad. Mason claims his activities were funded secretly by the War Office and were approved by Churchill. There was a hiatus of several months after the election of the Labour government before the unit’s activities resumed.

Mason said last week, that the unit’s preferred method was to collect the Nazis from prison camps, on the pretext that they were required to give evidence at Nuremberg. He and his fellow soldiers would check their identities and confront them with a file listing their atrocities before executing them. He said: “All the SS were tattooed with their number.Some used battery acid to try and burn it off and conceal themselves. If you saw a big scar, you knew who they were. They would fold up when they were shown the evidence.”

Mason and his comrades, Nobby Clark and Josef Galinsky, killed their targets using German guns, including the Walther P381 pistol and the Luger P08, to make it appear that they had committed suicide. Alternatively Mason would claim that they had been shot attempting to escape.

The Germans’ bodies were bundled into a hidden compartment in a Czech-built vehicle and dumped at a British camp. The unit was armed with Colt 45 pistols, M1 carbines and Thompson sub machineguns. Mason, a firearms expert, met Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, in 1959 and inspired him to equip the fictional spy with silenced weapons. Fleming later sent Mason a minature dagger as a token of appreciation.

The most notorious victim of the SAS unit was Otto Ortegies, a Hitler Youth leader, who was suspected of killing two British secret agents: He is said have castrated them and left them to bleed to death from telegraph poles. Mason and his fellow soldiers traced Ortgies to a Munich hotel room and led him out to be shot.

The story of the revenge mission is to be told in Master Spies, to be screened on Discovery Channel on January 11.

Mason, who once escorted Anthony Blunt, the traitor to Germany to retrieve letters by the Duke of Windsor will disclose further exploits in a book to be published this summer by Phillips Publicationstions, of New Jersey. Jim Phillips, owner of the publishing company, claims he has documents that authenicate Mason’s story. One water damaged sheet of paper is dated May 8,1945, and starnped with the marks 2 SAS and the initials AG3 V W.

Mason, who wishes to keep secret his address in North America, maintains he has no regrets about his role as assassin. “I am proud of what I did,” he said.

Sunday Times 28 December 1997

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WHEN REALITY BECOMES A TIMELESS FICTION – IAN FLEMMING AUTHOR OF THE GREAT MANY JAMES BOND 007 BOOKS WHICH HAVE SUBSEQUENTLY BECOME ICONIC FILMS

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THE ACTORS WHO HAVE PLAYED JAMES BONDJames Bond-1525126 James_Bond_35838

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SOME OF THE GORGEOUS LADIES WHO HAVE PLAYED BOND GIRLS

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SOME OF THE MANY ACTORS WHO HAVE PLAYED BOND VILLAINS

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BRITISH WW2 FEMALE SOE (SPECIAL OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE ) SECRET AGENT AND HEROINE VIOLETTE SZABO, GEORGE CROSS,M.B.E, CROIX de GUERRE, MEDAILLE DE LA RESISTANCE – 1921-1945

HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL WE FEATURE THE  BRITISH SECRET AGENT – VIOLETTE SZABO, ALONG WITH OTHER SOE HERO’S AND HEROINES, SAS (SPECIAL AIR SERVICE) AND  OTHER  UK SPECIAL FORCES.

 NOT FORGETTING OF COURSE OUR WW2 NAZI HOLOCAUST EXHIBITION FOR WHICH WE FEATURE AND INCLUDE MANY OF THE ABOVE WHO HAD BEEN  CAPTURED, TORTURED AND SUBSEQUENTLY EXECUTED BY THE NAZI’S DURING THIS HORRIFIC PERIOD.

WE ALSO HAVE A NUMBER OF PERSONALLY SIGNED EXHIBIT ITEMS KINDLY DONATED TO THE MUSEUM AND ON DISPLAY FROM VIOLETTE SZABO’S DAUGHTER – TANIA WHO HAS CARRIED ON THE LEGACY OF HER MOTHER SINCE HER DEATH IN 1945 .

BELOW ARE A FEW  PICTURES TAKEN AT  A RECENT GET-TOGETHER AND CATCH-UP WITH TANIA  , DAUGHTER OF  WW2 S.O.E. ( SPECIAL OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE )  HEROINE – VIOLETTE SZABO … PARTICULARLY SPECIAL WHEREBY SHE KINDLY BROUGHT ALONG AS A SURPRISE , HER MOTHERS GEORGE MEDAL , CROIX DE GUERRE AND THE MEDAILLE DE LA RESISTANCE  FOR WHICH TANIA HAD RECEIVED POSTHUMOUSLY AS A YOUNG CHILD. A GREAT PRIVILEGE TO HAVE SEEN AND HELD SUCH A HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT PIECE OF HISTORY . 

 

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ANDY JONES WITH VIRGINIA McKENNA   AT A RECENT VIOLETTE SZABO MEMORIAL EVENT AT THE VIOLETTE SZABO MUSEUM , WORMELOW IN 2014

ANDY JONES WITH VIRGINIA McKENNA AT A RECENT VIOLETTE SZABO MEMORIAL EVENT AT THE VIOLETTE SZABO MUSEUM , WORMELOW IN 2014

Below is a signed image of Tania Szabo wearing the medals she received posthumously for and behalf of her mother Violette now on display at the Crime Through Time Collection 

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HERE AT THE CRIME THROUGH TIME COLLECTION , LITTLEDEAN JAIL, FOREST OF DEAN, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, UK ….. WE FEATURE MANY OF THE UK’S SPECIAL FORCES INCLUDING PERSONAL TESTAMENTS TO MANY OF OUR HEROINES INCLUDING SOE VIOLETTE SZABO WHO WAS CAPTURED , TORTURED AND  MURDERED BY THE NAZI’S AT RAVENSBRUCK CONCENTRATION CAMP IN 1945 (AGED 23)

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Violette Szabo

NicknameLouise (also: La P’tite Anglaise)Born26 June 1921
ParisFranceDied5 February 1945 (aged 23)
RavensbrückNazi GermanyAllegianceUnited KingdomFranceService/branchSpecial Operations Executive,
First Aid Nursing YeomanryYears of service1941-1945 (FANY) /
1942/43-1945 (SOE)RankEnsignUnitF SectionAwardsUK George Cross ribbon.svg  George Cross  
Croix de Guerre 1939-1945 ribbon.svg   Croix de Guerre
Medaille de la Resistance ribbon.svg    Medaille de la Resistance

Violette-Szabo

Violette Szabo was born Violette Reine Elizabeth Bushell in Paris, on 26 June 1921, the second child of a French mother and an English taxi-driver father, who had met during World War I. The family moved to London, and she attended school in Brixton until the age of 14. At the start of World War II, she was working at the perfume counter of Le Bon Marché, a department store in Brixton.

Violette met Étienne Szabo, a French officer of Hungarian descent, at the Bastille Day parade in London in 1940. They married on 21 August 1940 after a whirlwind 42-day romance. Violette was 19, Étienne was 31. Shortly after the birth of their only child, Tania, Étienne died from chest wounds at the Battle of El Alamein in October 1942. He had never seen his daughter. It was Étienne’s death that made Violette, having already joined the Auxiliary Territorial Service in 1941, decide to offer her services to the British Special Operations Executive (SOE).

Below shows Violette with her husband Etienneimages

After an assessment for fluency in French and a series of interviews, she was inducted into SOE. She received intensive training in night and daylight navigation; escape and evasion, both Allied and German weapons, unarmed combat, demolitions, explosives, communications and cryptography. In his book “Das Reich” Max Hastings comments that Szabo was adored by the men and women of SOE both for her courage and endless infectious cockney laughter. An ankle injury during parachute training delayed her deployment until 5 April 1944, when she parachuted into German-occupied France, near Cherbourg.

Under the code name “Louise”, which also happened to be her nickname, she and SOE colleague Philippe Liewer reorganised a Resistance network that had been broken up by the Germans. She led the new group in sabotaging road and railway bridges. Her wireless reports to SOE headquarters on the local factories producing war materials for the Germans were important in establishing Allied bombing targets. She returned to England by Lysander on 30 April 1944, landing at RAF Tempsford, after an intense but successful first mission.

Second mission

She flew to the outskirts of Limoges, France on 7 June 1944 (immediately following D-Day) from RAF Tempsford. Immediately on arrival, she coordinated the activities of the local Maquis (led by Jacques Dufour) in sabotaging communication lines during German attempts to stem the Normandy landings.

She was a passenger in a car that raised the suspicions of German troops at an unexpected roadblock that had been set up to find Sturmbannführer Helmut Kämpfe of the Das Reich Division, who had been captured by the local resistance.

A brief gun battle ensued. Her Maquis minders escaped unscathed in the confusion. However, Szabo was captured when she ran out of ammunition, around midday on 10 June 1944, near Salon-la-Tour. Her captors were most likely from the 1st Battalion of 3rd SS Panzer Grenadier Regiment Deutschland (Das Reich Division). In R.J. Minney’s biography she is described as putting up fierce resistance with her Sten gun, although German documents of the incident record no German injuries or casualties. A recent biography of Vera Atkins, the intelligence officer for the French section of SOE, notes that that there was a great deal of confusion about what happened to Szabo—the story was revised four times—and states that the Sten gun incident “was probably a fabrication.”

Interrogation, torture and execution

She was transferred to the custody of the Sicherheitsdienst(SD) (SS Security Service) in Limoges, where she was interrogated for four days. From there, she was moved to Fresnes Prison in Paris and brought to Gestapo headquarters at 84 Avenue Foch for interrogation and torture. In August 1944, she was moved to Ravensbrück concentration camp, where over 92,000 women died. Although she endured hard labour and malnutrition, she managed to help save the life of Belgian resistance courier Hortense Clews.

Violette Szabo was executed, aged 23, by SS firing squad on or about 5 February 1945. Her body was cremated in the camp’s crematorium.

Three other women members of the SOE were also executed at Ravensbrück: Denise BlochCecily Lefort, and Lilian Rolfe. Of the SOE’s 55 female agents, thirteen were killed in action or died in Nazi concentration camps

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BELOW ARE SOME BRIEF IMAGES OF AN ORIGINAL WW2 “F.A.N.Y” (FIRST AID NURSING YEOMANRY ) – WTS (WOMENS TRANSPORT SERVICES ) UNIFORM COMPLETE WITH ITS ORIGINAL WW2 ISSUE GAS MASK … AS WOULD HAVE ALSO BEEN WORN BY VIOLETTE SZABO DURING HER DUTIES PRIOR TO HAVING BEEN SECONDED TO THE SOE  (SPECIAL OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE ) AS A BRITISH SECRET AGENT .

A VERY SCARCE AND HIGHLY SOUGHT AFTER HISTORIC ITEM IN ITS OWN RIGHT  DISPLAYED HERE TOO IN AND AMONGST OTHER WW2 F.A.N.Y , ATS, WTS ETC ETC WOMEN IN WARTIME MOVEMENTS

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World War 2 FANY ( First Aid Nursing Yeomany) uniform on mannequin displayed along with an original WW2   anti aircraft binocular gunsight on tripod now on display to the public here at the Crime Through Time Collection at Littledean jail, Gloucestershire

World War 2 FANY ( First Aid Nursing Yeomany) uniform on mannequin displayed along with an original WW2   anti aircraft binocular gunsight on tripod now on display to the public here at the Crime Through Time Collection at Littledean jail, Gloucestershire

BELOW AND ABOVE

World War 2 FANY ( First Aid Nursing Yeomany) uniform on mannequin displayed along with an original WW2 anti aircraft binocular gunsight on tripod now on display to the public here at the Crime Through Time Collection at Littledean jail, Gloucestershire

World War 2 FANY ( First Aid Nursing Yeomany) uniform on mannequin displayed along with an original WW2   anti aircraft binocular gunsight on tripod now on display to the public here at the Crime Through Time Collection at Littledean jail, Gloucestershire

below… Film poster advertising “CARVE HER NAME WITH PRIDE” based on the heroine -Violette Szabo… starring Virginia McKenna and Paul Scofield2

ORIGINAL  1958 CINEMA RELEASE POSTER

ORIGINAL 1958 CINEMA RELEASE POSTER

George Cross posthumously awarded to Violette Szabo’s daughter Tania
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Croix de Guerre posthumously awarded to Violette Szabo’s daughter Tania 4

Tania Szabó is Violette’s daughter, although, as she says, she is of an age to be her mother’s grandmother by now. On her ninth birthday, in June 1951, she sailed forAustralia with her grandparents, Charles and Reine Bushell, on the £10 ticket. After college in Armidale, NSW and a stint as a psychiatric nurse in Sydney, she returned to England in the New Year of 1963. It was so very cold.

     After working as a secretary, croupier, office administrator in various companies, completing a course in computing in the late 60s (cards with holes and no electronics) and spending a year in Beverley Hills studying Spanish while continuing her studies in the humanities, she returned to England and finally moved to Jersey in April 1976 where she opened her Language Studio with the help of Paul Emile Francis Holley, a friend of Violette’s. He also trained her in the recognition of German armaments and uniforms as he was a British Intelligence Officer during WWII.


Tania is an author as well as a professional multilingual translator and private tutor. The author, Avv. Mario Zacchi of Florence and author of Il Mastino Napoletano – the Italian Mastiff, the Standard and History of this amazing dog commissioned Tania to translate it. It is now lodged with the British Library. Zacchi’s writing in his native Italian immediately draws you into the mystery, fierce loyalty and funny antics of this Cerebus of dogs and it was a sheer delight for Tania to translate into English bringing his love and erudition of this remarkable breed to an anglophone readership.

On 29 April 2009, Paul Holley, the Intelligence officer,  who had trained Violette in German armaments and uniforms, and was Tania’s friend and mentor, died one month into his 90th year. She continues to miss his friendship and invaluable support. She has closed her Language Studio and now retired could no longer afford to live in Jersey and now lives in a lovely 17th century cottage just outside Builth Wells in Wales. She is still sorting out all the books and archives before completing her paperback version of Young Brave and Beautiful and getting back down to writing Etienne’s amazing life’s story.

Violette’s only daughter Tania Szabo pictured at her home in Jersey i 2007

6 (1) Violette’s only daughter Tania Szabo pictured as a young child shortly after the death of her mother 6 (2) Various publications relating to the life of Violette Szabo 7 8

Below is a historical insight into the Ravensbruck Nazi Death Camp where upon she was imprisoned and executed

AIR RAID PROTECTION (ARP) WARDENS IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR HERE THROUGHOUT BRITAIN

HERE AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL …. AS WELL AS THE ORIGINAL PRESERVED AND RESTORED SECOND WORLD WAR ANDERSON SHELTER ON DISPLAY , WE HAVE AN ARRAY OF ARP WARDENS , SECOND WORLD WAR POLICE AND HOME GUARD UNIFORMS , INSIGNIA , RATION BOOKS , PETROL COUPONS , GAS MASKS AND OTHER ASSOCIATED MEMORABILIA ON DISPLAY TOO .

BELOW ARE VARIOUS ARP IMAGES AS WELL AS A SERIES OF FIVE VERY INTERESTING AND EDUCATIONAL  VIDEO DOCUMENTARIES OF ARP WARDENS INVOLVEMENT DURING THE GERMAN LUFTWAFFE BOMBING BLITZ ON THE UK THROUGHOUT THE SECOND WORLD WAR ……

THERE IS ALSO A MUST SEE FULL COLOUR RECENTLY DISCOVERED NEWSREEL FOOTAGE OF THE BLITZ ON BRITAIN .

Air Raid Precautions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Silver 1936 ARP lapel badge

Air Raid Precautions (ARP) was an organisation in the United Kingdom set up as an aid in the prelude to the Second World War dedicated to the protection of civilians from the danger of air-raids. It was created in 1924 as a response to the fears about the growing threat from the development of bomber aircraft.Giulio Douhet had published his influential Command of the Air in 1921 and his main thesis had been memorably taken into English as “the bomber will always get through“.

The bombing of Britain in the First World War began on 19 January 1915 when zeppelins dropped bombs on the Great Yarmouth area, killing six people.German bombing operations of the First World War were surprisingly effective, especially after the Gotha bombers surpassed the zeppelins. The most devastating raids inflicted 121 casualties for each ton of bombs dropped and it was this figure that was used as a basis for predictions. The 1924 ARP Committee produced figures estimating that inLondon there would be 9,000 casualties in the first two days and then a continuing rate of 17,500 casualties a week. These rates were thought conservative.[citation needed

]Origins

It was believed that associated there would be “total chaos and panic” and hysterical neurosis as the people of London would try to flee the city. To control the population harsh measures were proposed—bringing London under almost military control; physically cordoning London with 120,000 troops to force people back to work. A different government department proposed setting up camps for refugees for a few days before sending them back to London.

These schemes remained on paper only and while estimates of potential damage remained high, the Air Raids Commandant (Major General H. Pritchard of the Royal Engineers) favoured a more reasoned solution. He discerned that panic and flight were basically problems of morale, if the people could be organised, trained and provided with protection then they would not panic. As part of this scheme the country was divided into regions each having its own command and control structure, in potentia at least.

The 1924 estimates were, during the build up to World War II, regularly revised upwards, particularly in the light of the 1937 German bombing of GuernicaSpain. In 1938 the Air Ministry predicted 65,000 casualties a week—in the first month of war the British government was expecting a million casualties, 3 million refugees and the majority of the capital destroyed. Measures to control this devastation were largely limited to grisly discussions about body disposal and the distribution of over a million burial forms to local authorities. In the same year the Socialist biologist JBS Haldanewrote a book titled A.R.P. (Air Raid Precautions) addressed to “the ordinary citizen, the sort of man and woman who is going to be killed if Britain is raided again from the air” and intended it to be a scientific counterbalance to the “propaganda” that comprised the majority of existing literature at the time. In the book, Haldane strongly criticises the measures taken by the government based on his professional knowledge of human physiology combined with his front-line experiences in the Spanish Civil War.[1]

At the outbreak of the war the British government knew that air attacks would be a main part of the Germans war tactics so they ordered 1,000,000 coffins after war was declared.[citation needed] The 1939 Hailey Conference had decided that providing deep shelters would lead to workers staying underground rather than working. This policy was reversed in 1940 when 79 tube stations opened for use as overnight shelters and specialised deep shelter construction begun.

[edit]World War II

An ARP bell

During the Second World War, the ARP was responsible for the issuing of gas masks, pre-fabricated air-raid shelters (such as Anderson shelters, as well as Morrison shelters), the upkeep of local public shelters, and the maintenance of the blackout. The ARP also helped rescue people after air raids and other attacks, and some women became ARP Ambulance Attendants whose job was to help administer first aid to casualties, search for survivors, and in many grim instances, help recover bodies, sometimes those of their own colleagues.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists members of the ARP within its casualty reports for civilian war dead. The Hamilton Road Cemetery in Deal, Kent has the graves of two serving ARP members, one who died on duty during an air raid in 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain, and an Ambulance Attendant who was killed by a cross-channel shelling attack in 1944.

As the war progressed, the effectiveness of aerial bombardment was, beyond the destruction of property, very limited. There were less than three casualties for each ton of bombs dropped by the Luftwaffe in many British cities and the expected social consequences hardly happened.[citation needed] The morale of the British people remained high, ‘shell-shock‘ was not at all common, and the rates of other nervous and mental ailments declined.

During the war the ARP was headquartered at Baylis House in Slough, Buckinghamshire. With the development of the Civil Defence Service in 1941, the main function of the ARP fell within the remit of this organisation. However, the term remained in usage and on signage throughout the war. Although disbanded in 1946, the functions of the ARP were revived as part of the Civil Defence Corps formed in 1949.

[edit]Wardens

Air Raid Warden testing his equipment in Brisbane in October 1942.

Air Raid wardens or ARP wardens had the task of patrolling the streets during blackout, to ensure that no light was visible. If a light was spotted, the warden would alert the person/people responsible by shouting something like “Put that light out!” or “Cover that window!”. They could report persistent offenders to the local police. They also patrolled the streets during air raids and doused incendiary bombs with sandbags where possible.

Other duties included helping to police areas suffering bomb damage and helping bombed-out householders. ARP wardens were trained in fire-fighting and first aid, and could keep an emergency situation under control until official rescue services arrived.

There were around 1.4 million ARP wardens in Britain during the war, almost all unpaid part-time volunteers who also held day-time jobs. They had a basic uniform consisting of a set of overalls and an armlet, along with a black steel helmet. Later in the war they would be issued with the dark blue battledress issued to Civil Defence members. The steel helmet had W for Warden in bold white writing across it, except for Chief Wardens who wore white helmets with black lettering.

Many wardens went considerably beyond the call of duty and a search of medal citations in the London Gazette demonstrates this. The first ARP warden to receive the George Cross was Thomas Alderson, who won his award for actions saving civilian life in Bridlington in 1940.[2]

[edit]Fire Guard Messengers

With a general lack of radio communications and telephone communications prone to disruption by air raids, many towns appointed children volunteers aged between 14 and 18 as messengers or runners. These Fire Guard Messengers would run or cycle through the night raids ferrying messages between ARPs and the fire department units and incendiary volunteers with their buckets of sand. [3]

WWW.2 ANDERSON SHELTER & AIR RAID PROTECTION ( ARP) MEMORABILIA ON DISPLAY AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL

VARIOUS IMAGES HERE OF A PRESERVED AND FULLY RESTORED SECOND WORLD WAR ORIGINAL ANDERSON SHELTER AS WAS USED IN NEWPORT, WALES. THIS PARTICULAR SHELTER HAD NOT BEEN PARTIALLY BURIED  BENEATH THE GROUND AND WAS SURFACE BUILT AT THE TIME ABOVE GROUND WITH SANDBAGS FOR PROTECTION

REBUILT AND HERE ON DISPLAY TO COMPLIMENT OUR SECOND WORLD WAR NAZI HOLOCAUST EXHIBITION AND TO SIMPLY PROVIDE A NOSTALGIC AND AN EDUCATIONAL  INSIGHT INTO HOW MANY FAMILIES FOUND SHELTER DURING THE GERMAN LUFTWAFFE BOMBINGS THROUGHOUT BRITAIN .

ALSO ON DISPLAY WE HAVE VARIOUS ARP (AIR RAID PROTECTION) UNIFORMS,GAS MASKS , INSIGNIA AND OTHER 2ND WORLD WAR MEMORABILIA ITEMS

SEE BELOW SLIDESHOW FOR IMAGES OF THE ANDERSON SHELTER AT LITTLEDEAN JAIL AND OTHER EXAMPLES FROM AROUND THE UK .

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SHELTER

In November 1938, Chamberlain placed Sir John Anderson in charge of Air Raid Precautions (ARP). He immediately commissioned the engineer, William Patterson, to design a small and cheap shelter that could be erected in people’s gardens. Within a few months nearly one and a half million of what became known as Anderson shelters were distributed to people living in areas expected to be bombed by the Luftwaffe.

Made from six curved sheets bolted together at the top, with steel plates at either end, and measuring 6ft 6in by 4ft 6in (1.95m by 1.35m) the shelter could accommodate six people. These shelters were half buried in the ground with earth heaped on top. The entrance was protected by a steel shield and an earthen blast wall.

Anderson shelters were given free to poor people. Men who earned more than £5 a week could buy one for £7. Soon after the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939, over 2 million families had shelters in their garden. By the time of the Blitz this had risen to two and a quarter million.

When the Luftwaffe changed from daylight to night bombing raids, the government expected people to sleep in their Anderson shelters. Each night the wailing of the air raid sirens announced the approach of the German bombers and ensured that most people had time to take cover before the raid actually started.

Anderson shelters were dark and damp and people were reluctant to use them at night. In low-lying areas they tended to flood and sleeping was difficult as they did not keep out the sound of the bombings. Another problem was that the majority of people living in industrial areas did not have gardens where they could erect their shelters.

A census held in November 1940 discovered that the majority of people in London did not use specially created shelters. The survey revealed that of those interviewed, 27 per cent used Anderson shelters, 9 per cent slept in public shelters whereas 4 per cent used underground railway stations (4 per cent). The rest of those interviewed were either on duty at night or slept in their own homes.

In March 1941 the government began issuing Morrison Shelters. Named after the Home Secretary, Herbert Morrison, the shelters were made of very heavy steel and could be put in the living room and used as a table. One wire side lifted up for people to crawl underneath and get inside. Morrison shelters were fairly large and provided sleeping space for two or three people.

CLICK ON BELOW IMAGE OF ANDERSON SHELTER TO VIEW HISTORIC BRITISH PATHE NEWSREEL FOOTAGE ABOUT ANDERSON SHELTERS DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR